UP murder suspect allegedly injected with acid by police dies, 3 suspended #WTFnews


IANS,  LUCKNOW, MAY 18, 2013 | UPDATED 18:29 IST

TAGS: Police brutality | Uttar Pradesh | Acid injections |Kerosene | UP Police
UP Police
UP Police

A murder suspect was given injections of acid and kerosene during police questioning in Uttar Pradesh, following which he fell sick and died in a hospital. Three errant policemen were suspended, an official said on Saturday.

Accused Balbir was brought to Avagarh police station in Etah district on Thursday and allegedly made to sit on a hot plate and given injections of acid and kerosene.

He died of infection and lacerations at a hospital in Lucknow on Friday evening, police said.

Family members of Balbir alleged that police tortured him to force him to confess to the crime.

Deputy Inspector General of Police, Aligarh, Prakash D. said that Etah‘s Senior Superintendent of Police Ajay Mohan Sharma suspended sub-inspector Shailendra Singh and two others.

A case has been registered against the errant policemen and a magisterial probe ordered into the incident, a police official said.

Read more at:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/murder-suspect-injected-with-acid-by-police-dies-cops-suspended/1/271846.html

 

Jaipur: 5 deaf, mute orphan girls raped and beaten by school staff #Vaw #WTFnews


PTI  Jaipur, May 18, 2013

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Five deaf and mute orphan girls were allegedly raped and beaten by staff at a residential school run by an NGO in Kanota area in Jaipur.

Four persons, including the director of the NGO ‘Awaaz Foundation’ have been arrested after the incident was reported to police on Saturday, DCP (East) Shweta Dhankar said on Sunday.

“The girls, aged between 15-17 years, were staying at the hostel run by Awaaz Foundation where two employees Ashok and Suresh had been sexually exploiting them for some time. The girls were raped and beaten, and when they approached the NGO officials, their complaints were ignored,” she said.

The girls were from a juvenile shelter home in Gandhi Nagar and had been sent to the residential school, which runs with the support from the Social Justice department, to undergo a training, police said.

The case came to light when the girls returned to their shelter home, run by the state government, in Gandhi Nagar after completing the course.

“We have arrested Alpana Sharma, who runs the NGO, and employees Geeta, Suresh and Ashok. A few more arrests are likely to happen soon,” the DCP added.

Police said that 109 students were staying at the hostel, which has been functioning for the last six years.

Meanwhile, People’s Union for Civil Liberties activists today protested in front of the girls’ home in Gandhi Nagar and demanded action against the culprits involved in the case.

 

Man gets 10-year RI for locking wife’s private parts #VAW #WTFnews


TNN | May 18, 2013, 05.07 AM IST

Man gets 10-year RI for locking wife's private parts
Chouhan’s cruelty had come to light after his wife tried to commit suicide by consuming poison.
INDORE: The district court on Friday sentenced a 45-year-old man to 10 years of rigorous imprisonment for putting a ‘chastity lock’ on his wife’s private parts.

Special additional sessions judge A K Singh found Sohan Lal Chouhan guilty under sections 326 (causing grievous hurt) and 498 A (subjecting married woman to cruelty) of the IPC. The court also imposed a fine of Rs 1,000 on him.

Public prosecutor Jyoti Tomar said Chouhan was arrested in July 2012. Out of the 14 witnesses presented before the court, three — including the couple’s son and daughter — had turned hostile. “However, the son admitted Chouhan hadn’t allowed him to meet his mother in the last four years,” Tomar said. “Besides, the statements of the doctor who had removed the ‘lock’, the policeman who had recovered the key from Chouhan and an independent witness helped in nailing Chouhan.”

Chouhan’s cruelty had come to light after his wife tried to commit suicide by consuming poison. While trying to insert a tube to extract the poison, hospital doctors were stunned to see the ‘locked’ genitals. She then revealed her husband had performed a crude surgery on her to ‘lock’ her private parts four years ago. In a statement, she said he suspected her of having an extramarital relationship.

The woman was married to Chouhan when she was 16 years old. She had consumed pesticide after Chouhan tried to rape their elder daughter.

 

No Justice For Insaf


SABA NAQVI, Outlook Magazine, May 27, 2013
http://www.outlookindia.com
 
Right to protest suffers another setback with this forum stifled
On April 30, 2013, the Union ministry of home froze the bank account of a coalition known as INSAF (Indian Social Action Forum) and suspended its registration under the Foreign Contribution Regulation Act or FCRA. INSAF is a network of 700 NGOs, people’s movements against acquisition of lands and forests and other resistances from Koodankulam to Kashmir. It has been a sort of facilitator, a clearing house for donations and support to various struggles. The home ministry believes its actions to “be prejudicial to public interest”.
On May 13, less than two weeks after the attempt to stifle INSAF, news agency Reuters filed this report: “Foreign institutional investors’ (FIIs) ownership of the BSE Sensex stocks touched its highest in eight years as of the January-March quarter, Bank of America Merrill Lynch said in a research report. During the Jan-March quarter, FIIs were net buyers of Indian equities, while domestic mutual fund companies and state-owned insurer lic were sellers, it said. According to regulatory data, FIIs have been net buyers for 15 consecutive sessions, bringing their total investment for the year to $12.70 billion.”
The contrast is quite remarkable. We celeb­rate those who come to set up business, invest in the stock market, mine our natural resources, build nuclear plants and run them. These investors in smart suits and sharp shoes are to be feted and waited upon. They are the good people with the big bucks who fit into the idea of India as an economic powerhouse, the winners in this game of globalisation.
Then there are the wretched of the earth who stand in the way of this wonderful progress. These little people inconvenience the big plans, be it the POSCO project in Orissa, SEZs across the country or the nuclear plant in Tamil Nadu. There seems to be no ambiguity on the issue for those who run the country, frame its laws and implement them: those who resist are a danger to public order.
Given the recent action on INSAF, one can only presume this is the Orwellian standard that will now be applied in a future India. Without getting into the complexity of FCRA, there is something seriously wrong with the spirit of the law. Basically, it can be countered not by legalese but by a very simple argument: if a government can get billions of dollars worth of foreign investment for a specific project that is cleared on paper, why can’t a meagre amount of foreign funds reach activists who wish to help those who actually live on the land where these projects are planned? And we are talking small change here, a few thousands to a few lakhs compared to the billions on the other side.
How did we end up creating a world where those who make the blueprints are celebrated while those who sweat it out with people are seen as dangerous?
The attempt to crack down on INSAF has been made possible because of the amendments to FCRA in 2010. Rule 3 of the law now says that the activity of any organisation that “employs common methods like bandh or hartal, rasta roko or jail bharo” will be deemed political in nature although it is not a political party. The government, of course, has the right to define such organisations.
The point here is not to argue against a scrutiny of funds that come for political activity. The rules, in fact, began to be tightened in 1984 when several Sikh organisations using violent methods were getting funds from abroad. The VHP likewise raises money outside India for activities that are certainly political. But how can legitimate struggles against specific policies, the leitmotif of a healthy democracy, be seen in the same light as advocacy of separatism, violence or communal hatred? The UN Human Rights Cou­ncil resolution adopted on March 21 this year actually called upon states to ensure that “restrictions are not discriminatorily imposed on potential sources of funding aimed at supporting the work of human rights defenders”.
And if we are so suspicious of foreign funds coming for those who influence public opinion, why leave out the media? According to a FICCI report, FDI inflows to the information & broadcasting sector, including the print media, was $2.17 billion in India in Apr 2010-Mar 2011. The same report says that “India has one of the most liberal investment regimes and the media and entertainment industry has significantly benefited from this.” But we see no grand conspiracy about the “foreign hand” if the news channel we watch or the newspaper we read is partly owned by foreign groups when in fact there is evidence that the media now accepts certain agendas unquestioningly.
The INSAF story is at its core an action against the idea of legitimate protest on which this country was built. In an age of corruption at every level, it’s an obvious attempt to intimidate those who challenge certain notions of “progress” and care about things other than profit margins.

 

NAC Working Group on Universal Health Coverage Final Recommendations


09th May, 2013
The National Advisory Council had constituted a Working Group of its Members on “Universal Health Coverage”. The Working Group looked into the issue to propose measures to ensure quality health coverages to all the citizens which are equitable, affordable and unviersal.
02. The Working Group has had several rounds of consultations with the concerned central Ministries, senior officers of the State Governments, Civil Society and Experts. Based on the consultations, the Working Group has come up with the set of draft recommendations in this regard.
03. The draft recommendations of the Working Group are now placed in public domain for comments.
 
 
Comments may be sent to the Convener of the Working Group of NAC by 25th May, 2013 by email at wg-uhc.nac@nic.in 

 

Raped in India? Better marry your rapist, says G P Mathur retired jurist #Vaw #Womenrights #WTFnews


To Wed Your Rapist, or Not: Indian Women on Trial

By TRIPTI LAHIRI and AMOL SHARMA

[image]Associated PressActivists in New Delhi marched on Parliament earlier this year, protesting in one of several high-profile sexual-assault cases that have focused attention on women’s rights in India.

NEW DELHI—Just weeks after a gang-rape that shocked India, the National Human Rights Commission convened a meeting to discuss what to do about violence against women.

At the January gathering, G.P. Mathur, a retired Supreme Court justice, startled the crowd: He said it can be appropriate for women to marry their alleged rapists, provided the marriage isn’t coerced. In a recent interview with The Wall Street Journal in which he elaborated on his views, Mr. Mathur described such marriages as “compromises” that victims and their families seek in order to avoid the stigma of a public trial.

As India engages in soul-searching after a series of high-profile sexual assaults, prominent lawyers, professors, women’s advocates and even some judges say the views of some of India’s judiciary can be an obstacle to justice. The Indian legal system is built on British common law, and cases are decided by a sitting judge, not by a jury.

There is “a bias that begins in the society and spills over to the courtroom,” in certain sex-assault and domestic-violence cases, said Indira Jaising, an Indian additional solicitor general, a top federal legal-advisory position. She has called for a “gender audit,” an examination of rulings for bias, to be added to the process of elevating judges to higher courts.

“Courts repeatedly talk about getting married as the most important thing for a woman,” said Mrinal Satish, a National Law University professor whose research shows that courts have given shorter sentences to rapists of women judged not to be virgins, compared with rapists of virgins.

The rape of an unmarried virgin was viewed by the courts as “a loss of value because of which she’s not being able to get married,” Mr. Satish said. “It’s not legal reasoning.” He examined some 800 High Court and Supreme Court rape-case appeals decided between 1984 and 2009.

Since the December gang-rape and death of a 23-year-old woman on a bus in New Delhi, there have been widespread calls for better protection for women. The government has toughened rape penalties and vowed to put more female police officers on the beat. In recent weeks, new attacks—including the alleged rape of a five-year-old in Delhi—have sparked fresh protests.

Even though it is unusual for judges to criticize their peers, some are speaking out. A Supreme Court ruling in January expressed “anguish” over remarks by a lower-court judge suggesting that “wife-beating is a normal facet of married life.”

In the Journal interview, Mr. Mathur, the former Supreme Court justice, explained his view on marriage “compromise”—where a woman weds her alleged attacker—saying it can be an acceptable outcome if both people believe they can live happily together. He said victims’ families are often motivated to pursue such arrangements because the stigma of rape might otherwise make it difficult for the woman to marry. He reiterated that “it should be voluntary, a free consent.”

As an example, Mr. Mathur cited a case he adjudicated in 2007 that ended in marriage. In it, a man was convicted of forcing a woman to have a miscarriage, by use of a drug, without her consent, and was sentenced to seven years’ jail time.

[image]Getty Images‘There is a prejudice that plays itself out in judgments,’ says lawyer Vrinda Grover.

During appeal, the woman told the court she had since agreed to what Mr. Mathur called a compromise marriage. As a result, a Supreme Court bench of Mr. Mathur and Altamas Kabir (currently the court’s chief justice) reduced the man’s sentence to time served, about 10 months. Mr. Kabir declined to be interviewed through his secretary. The husband and wife couldn’t be reached for comment.

Mr. Mathur, in the Journal interview, also questioned the extent to which judges should rely on an alleged victim’s testimony. “A grown-up girl who is married or used to sexual intercourse, she can accuse anybody,” he said. “It is very easy for her to say, ‘Yes, this person raped me.'”

The question of a woman’s believability is at the heart of one appeal currently pending in Delhi’s High Court. In the case, a woman alleges she was raped by a friend when she visited his house for lunch.

A lower court ruled that she was lying, citing among other things the fact that she could have scratched the man’s genitals, but didn’t. “Ordinarily, where forcibly sexual intercourse is committed upon a grown up girl there would be…some injuries on the person of accused particularly, if she has long nails,” the 2011 judgment said. The lack of such injuries “indicates that the alleged intercourse was a peaceful affair.”

The trial judge didn’t respond to requests for comment delivered through his clerk. The defense lawyer said his client maintains his innocence.

Indian society can be conservative in its views of male-female relationships. These views found expression in the weeks after December’s gang-rape of a young woman on a New Delhi bus after a night at the movies—an attack that horrified India and the world.

In one instance, a prominent spiritual figure, Asaram Bapu, told his disciples that the victim could have avoided trouble if she had “chanted a prayer, taken one of her attackers by the hand, and called him ‘brother,'” according to a recording of the lecture. He also said, “If stronger laws are made, women will ensnare men with false cases.”

A spokeswoman for the guru confirmed the remarks were Mr. Bapu’s.

Separately, a local lawmaker in Rajasthan state, Banwari Lal Singhal, wrote to a government official saying that one solution to sexual violence is to not wear skirts at schools. Boys use cellphones to “click photos of girls while they wait for the school bus,” he said to the Journal at the time. “This increases social crime.”

In a recent interview, Mr. Singhal said his proposal was intended only for his district. He said another reason for girls to wear trousers or Indian garb, besides preventing sex crimes, is to protect against the desert climate.

In March, in Parliamentary debate over a bill strengthening sexual-violence laws, several legislators suggested that the government was going too far. The law, which ultimately passed, creates new crime categories including stalking.

“You’re saying girls shouldn’t be followed,” said Sharad Yadav, a legislator from Bihar state, according to a Parliament transcript. “Who among us has not followed girls? When you want to talk to a woman she won’t at first, you have to put in a lot of effort.”

Mr. Yadav didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Associated PressThe Indian Supreme Court’s chief justice, Altamas Kabir, has hailed some protesters.

Other lawmakers, however, took an opposing view. “What has happened to us?” said Pinaki Misra of Orissa state, the transcript shows. “There has to be a collective introspection that this country has to undertake.”

Indians pondering the roots of sexism debate many possible influences, from the machismo of swaths of northern India, to mythology, to caste. Caste-rights groups, in fact, say that some violence against women is a backlash against a modern blurring of caste lines. In particular they cite “honor killings,” in which young women and men are killed for forming relationships across caste lines. Mr. Yadav, in the March debate in Parliament, called for shelters for such couples, noting the immense harassment they face.

In a court of law, it can sometimes count against a woman if she has male friends. “There is a prejudice that plays itself out in judgments—if you are friendly with somebody, you are agreeing to making yourself available,” said lawyer Vrinda Grover.

Problems can also arise if a woman is perceived as disobedient to her family. In January the Supreme Court overturned a state-court acquittal of more than 30 men accused of raping a teenager and holding her as a sex slave. The lower court had acquitted based partly on testimony that the girl had once lied to her parents about having given money to a friend that was meant for her school expenses.

The lie suggested she was a “deviant,” the court ruled. The judge also wrote that the young woman appeared to be planning a trip with a male friend, “without any specific plan for marriage and family life with him.”

In an interview broadcast on Indian television earlier this year, one of the justices on the two-person bench, R. Basant, said he stood by the court’s assessment of deviance and its judgment. “She was used for child prostitution,” he said in that interview. “Child prostitution is not rape. It’s immoral.”

Mr. Basant, who now practices as a lawyer, declined to comment. The other judge is deceased.

Some judges are calling for greater awareness about crimes against women. In January, Mr. Kabir, the Supreme Court chief justice, hailed the protesters who took to the streets after December’s bus rape.

Bhagwati Prasad, the chief justice of Jharkhand state until retiring from the bench in 2011, said that judges, like anyone, are influenced by their social conditioning. “You have to forget everything” that happens outside the courtroom, Mr. Prasad said.

He said a court would likely consider it relevant in a sexual-assault case if the woman had prior sexual experience. Still, even in these cases, if the woman doesn’t alter her account under questioning, the court will believe her, he said. “Conviction is only secured when the girl sticks to her statement that, ‘Yes, I have been forced,'” he said.

Mr. Prasad also said that he was aware of cases in which he believed women were the aggressors against men. “I would not say that rape is only committed by boys,” he said. Asked for an example of such a case, Mr. Prasad offered a tale from Hindu mythology of a woman who tries to seduce her stepson.

Some textbooks until recently fostered the idea that it isn’t physically possible for some women to be raped. A 2005 edition of “Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology,” used in court for guidance on evaluating medical evidence, stated: “In normal circumstances, it is not possible for a single man to hold sexual intercourse with a healthy adult female in full possession of her senses against her will.”

It also stated that women of different social strata should be expected to offer different degrees of resistance to rape. “It is obvious that a woman belonging to a labouring class, who is accustomed to hard and rough work,” would be able to fight off an assailant, it said. But a middle-class woman “might soon faint or be rendered powerless from fright or exhaustion.”

This edition was used until 2011, when these passages were revised. The book now says it is “wrong to stereotype” in instances of rape. It also specifies that “rape is a crime and not a medical diagnosis.”

The 2011 edition, however, still refers to young women as “nubile virgins.” And in cases where assault victims are believed to be virgins, the book recommends a controversial vaginal exam, known as the “two-finger test,” that purports to show whether intercourse was physically possible.

LexisNexis India, which acquired the book’s Indian publisher in 2008, said it will completely overhaul the 2014 edition. “We realize how important this book is for the trial process,” said Abha Thapalyal Gandhi of LexisNexis India. The next edition will have “comprehensive changes” to reflect “gender justice approaches and new medical research.”

The book’s author died in 1954. K. Kannan, a retired justice and one of two editors for the 2011 edition, said, “I should have gone even more aggressively” in reworking the text. “We need to be sensitive,” he said.

Mr. Kannan said he is completely against the two-finger test. “Rape is not a medical thing,” he said. “It is not for doctors to be saying.”

Ved Kumari, a professor in Delhi University’s law school, suggested that adding more female judges, as some have advocated, won’t on its own address the bias issue. She described one female judge confiding in her that she had been “harsher to women litigants because I expected a higher level of adjustment from them compared with the men.” The judge comes from a traditional family, Ms. Kumari said, whereas a woman she has been required to make “a lot of sacrifices” herself.

Ms. Kumari, who also has served as chairwoman of the Delhi Judicial Academy, which provides training to serving judges, blames part of the problem on Indian legal education. Rape laws weren’t taught at Delhi University’s law school when she became a professor more than 25 years ago, she said. She and other colleagues pushed for their inclusion in the mid-1990s, she said. She recalled one male professor who declined to teach that portion of the class, so she did it herself.

The law school’s dean, Ashwani Kumar Bansal, who was a law professor at that time, called the episode a minor one. “Indian morés, ethos, were different” then, he said.

Things started changing in the late 1990s, when a small survey of Indian judges found that 48% of respondents said it was justifiable for a husband to occasionally slap his wife. After that, a group of nonprofit groups launched gender-sensitivity training for judges. The judges would meet with abuse victims and role-play the part of a victim’s parent.

It is difficult for judges to acknowledge that they carry “social baggage” and prejudices, said Samaresh Banerjea, a retired judge from Kolkata High Court. He went through the gender-sensitivity program a few years ago and said it altered his outlook.

Something “clicked in my mind,” he said. “To learn many things, you have to unlearn many things.”

Write to Tripti Lahiri at tripti.lahiri@wsj.com and Amol Sharma atamol.sharma@wsj.com

 

Australia – Calm killer and rapist caught taxi with her body in suitcase #Vaw #Racism


May 18, 2013, Sydney Morning Herald 
Tosha Thakkar. Happy girl: student Tosha Thakkar believed everyone was good. Photo: Supplied

The teenager casually wheels a large black suitcase out to a waiting taxi.

As he and the driver heft the case into the boot, the young man lies to explain the bag’s surprising weight and bulging contents, telling the driver it’s ”full of laptops and electrical gear”.

CCTV footage, later tendered as evidence, shows the 19-year-old Daniel Stani-Reginald chatting happily to the driver as they make a short trip to the Parramatta River.

-Callous lies: Footage of Daniel Stani-Reginald loading his suitcase into the taxi. Photo: NSW Police Force

He then removes the case and walks off.

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In the words of NSW Supreme Court Justice Derek Price the ”calmness demonstrated by the offender” in these moments showed the utter ”callousness of his crimes”.

On the morning of that taxi ride, on March 9, 2011, Stani-Reginald confronted Indian student Tosha Thakkar in the hallway of the second-storey boarding house they shared in the inner-west suburb of Croydon.

-The suitcase he told the driver was ”full of laptops and electrical gear”. Photo: NSW Police Force

Forcing the 24-year-old back into her room, he then raped and assaulted her and strangled her with a black coaxial cable.

The 19-year-old storeman then stuffed his victim’s body in a suitcase, booked a taxi to Meadowbank and dumped her in a canal that flows into Parramatta River.

”The last moments of her life must have been terrifying – this was a terrible way to die,” Justice Price said as he sentenced Stani-Reginald to at least 30 years’ jail on Friday.

-Stani-Reginald will be eligible for parole in March 2041, at the age of 49. Photo: NSW Police Force

The court heard that Stani-Reginald had been planning and fantasising about crime for months beforehand, viewing thousands of internet articles about serial killers, notorious rapists and murders in which the victim’s body was dumped in a suitcase.

These included Australian cases such as Dean Shillingsworth, the murdered toddler whose body was dumped in a suitcase, and foreign killers such as the Yorkshire Ripper and Richard Ramirez.

”There is documented evidence he had been planning similar offences for a period of years, gradually becoming more focused,” Justice Price said.

Shortly before the murder, Stani-Reginald had psyched himself up by viewing pornography, including videos of degrading acts being done to Indian women. Afterwards he returned to his computer to re-read an article entitled ”The Beginnings of a Serial Killer”.

”The offender’s lack of empathy for the enormity of his crime is evident from the articles he viewed online before and after the murders,” Justice Price said.

The court heard that a number of psychiatrists examined Stani-Reginald over the course of his extended criminal history. All but one found that while Stani-Reginald was disturbed, there was no clear evidence of a mental disorder or psychosis, even though as a child he had witnessed his father murder his mother.

Justice Price found that the now 21-year-old had demonstrated no contrition or remorse and represented a serious threat to the community.

”The offender’s prospects of rehabilitation are very poor. His juvenile record is replete with his refusals to accept assistance,” Justice Price said.

”I’m satisfied that there’s a real risk that the offender will reoffend with acts of violence and sexual assault.”

Nevertheless, Justice Price stopped short of sentencing Stani-Reginald to life, as prosecutors had suggested, finding the offender’s young age meant such a sentence could equate to as much as 60 years in jail.

He sentenced Stani-Reginald to a maximum of 45 years in jail with a minimum non-parole period of 30 years.

After the sentence was handed down, Ms Thakkar’s cousin Pratik Thakkar said the family had been expecting a life sentence and was disappointed.

”She was a happy girl and I think the only mistake she made is thinking all is good, everyone is good,” Mr Thakkar said.

”[Her parents] didn’t send her [to Australia] for these things. They wanted her to have a good life. It’s like everyone here; we want to be happy and live Australian life – that’s why she was here.”

With time served, Stani-Reginald will be eligible for parole in March 2041 at the age of 49.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/calm-killer-caught-taxi-with-her-body-in-suitcase-20130517-2jrxb.html#ixzz2Tcssx9e7

 

DAE 1972 Chakravarty Report states Jaitapur has potential sources of Earthquake


Radiation sign for maps

 

 

 

 

 

A section of the Jaitapur nuclear plant site selection committee’s report that was withheld by the government and was recently retrieved by a local Premanand Tiwarkar through the Right to Information Act (RTI) contradicts Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited’s (NPCIL) claim that the site is fit for a nuclear plant.

 

A 1972 study by the Site Selection Committee of the DAE states d, “Tectonic features in the region can be regarded as potential sources of earthquakes as some of them may get reactivated at any point….”

 

The relevent parts of report can be downloaded here

 

 

 

 

 

जगजीत सिंह, उद्धव ठाकरे और रमन सिंह करते हैं मजदूरी !


smart cards ‘reveal’ Jagjit Singh, Uddhav are labourers in MP

जगजीत सिंह, रमन सिंह, और उद्धव ठाकरे की तस्वीरों वाले नरेगा के स्मार्ट कार्ड।

टाइम्स ऑफ इंडिया | May 17, 2013, 01.03PM IST

भोपाल।। छत्तीसगढ़ के मुख्यमंत्री रमन सिंह, शिवसेना के नेता उद्धव ठाकरे और स्वर्गीय गजल गायक जगजीत सिंह मनरेगा के मजदूर हैं! मध्य प्रदेश के रेवा जिले में महात्मा गांधी राष्ट्रीय ग्रामीण रोजगार गांरटी स्कीम (मनरेगा) के कुछ स्मार्ट कार्ड देखकर आप भी हैरान रह जाएंगे।

मनरेगा स्कीम के तहत बैंक से पेमेंट के लिए बनाए गए स्थानीय लोगों के नाम वाले इन स्मार्ट कार्ड्स में तस्वीरें जानी-मानी हस्तियों की छपी हैं। ये कार्ड यूनियन बैंक ऑफ इंडिया ने 2009-10 में जारी किए थे। बैंक ने ये कार्ड FINO नाम की कंपनी से बनवाए थे।

कार्ड्स में बड़ा गड़बड़झाला है। एक कार्ड कैथा गांव के मंगल सेन के नाम से जारी किया गया है। लेकिन उस पर छत्तीसगढ़ के सीएम रमन सिंह की तस्वीर लगी है। इसी तरह गांव के राहुल दुबे के नाम से जारी कार्ड में स्वर्गीय जगजीत सिंह की फोटो है। उधर, रेवा के जिला कलेक्टर शिव नारायण रुपाला को इसमें धांधली का खेल नजर नहीं आता। उन्होंने कहा कि अगर ये कार्ड्स जालसाजी के लिए इरादे से बनाए गए होते तो इनमें जानी-मानी हस्तियों की तस्वीरें नहीं लगाई जातीं। रुपाला ने कहा इस इस मामले की जांच के लिए यूनियन बैंक के असिस्टेंट जनरल मैनेजर को निर्देश दिए गए हैं।

दूसरी तरफ यूबीआई के एजीएम एस.के. सिंह को इसकी पीछे कार्ड बनाने वाली कंपनी के किसी कर्मचारी की शरारत नजर आ रही है। उन्होंने कहा कि स्मार्ट कार्ड में लाभार्थी का फिंगरप्रिंट रेकॉर्ड भी होता है। इसलिए पहली नजर में उन्हें नहीं लगता कि इन कार्ड्स पर कोई पेमेंट हुआ होगा। उन्होंने इसका दोष कार्ड बनाने वाली कंपनी FINO पर मढ़ते हुए कहा कि गलती उनकी ओर से है। कंपनी के किसी कर्मचारी ने यह शरारत की है।

उन्होंने कहा कि इन कार्ड्स की डीटेल्स बैंक और FINO के सर्वर में नहीं है। ये कार्ड बैंक से लिंक भी नहीं है। उन्होंने कहा कि फिर भी इन कार्ड्स की पेमेंट डीटेल्स मांगी गई हैं। अगर कोई दोषी पाया जाता है तो उसके खिलाफ कार्रवाई की जाएगी।

उधर, FINO कंपनी के एक पूर्व कर्मचारी स्वप्न कुमार तिवारी ने कहा कि इसके पीछे करप्शन का खेल हो सकता है। आईटी एक्सपर्ट की मदद से इसकी जांच की जानी चाहिए। उन्होंने कहा कि इस गड़बड़ी को उजागर करने के बाद जून में कंपनी ने उन्हें सस्पेंड कर दिया था।

 

Fake ration cards being used for #Aadhaar cards in Goa #UID


aadhaar

Pilerne Citizens Forum in Goa has filed a complaint with Nandan Nilekani, chairman of the Unique Identification Authority of India

News | by IANS

PANAJI, GOA: Bogus ration cards, a fact which has been acknowledged by Goa’s civil supplies ministry, are being used to acquire Aadhaar cards in the state, a civil society group claimed Thursday.

“Bogus ration cards are being used as identity proofs, especially in slum areas, to get Aadhaar cards. This will reduce the social security number exercise to a farce,” Yatish Naik, a spokesperson of the Pilerne Citizens Forum (PCF) told reporters here.

The PCF, which brought to light instances where ration cards had been forged by the hundreds a couple of years back, has filed a complaint with Nandan Nilekani, chairman of the Unique Identification Authority of India — in-charge of the central agency implementing the Aadhaar card project.

“We have asked Nilekani to plug this loophole,” Naik said.

The civil supplies ministry has already ordered a probe into the problem of fake ration cards after a ruling legislator told the Goa assembly recently that Nepali and Bangladeshi nationals had obtained ration cards by forging documents.

 

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