National Urban Health Mission (NUHM) as a sub-mission under the National Health Mission (NHM)


PIB PRESS RELEASE

The Union Cabinet gave its approval to launch a National Urban Health Mission (NUHM) as a new sub-mission under the over-arching National Health Mission (NHM). Under the Scheme the following proposals have been approved :

1.        One Urban Primary Health Centre (U-PHC) for every fifty to sixty thousand population.

2.        One Urban Community Health Centre (U-CHC) for five to six U-PHCs in big cities.

3.        One Auxiliary Nursing Midwives (ANM) for 10,000 population.

4.        One Accredited Social Health Activist ASHA (community link worker) for 200 to 500 households.

The estimated cost of NUHM for 5 years period is Rs.22,507 crore with the Central Government share of Rs.16,955 crore. Centre-State funding pattern will be 75:25 except for North Eastern states and other special category states of Jammu and  Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand for whom the funding pattern will be 90:10.

The scheme will focus on primary health care needs of the urban poor. This Mission will be implemented in 779 cities and towns with more than 50,000 population and cover about 7.75 crore people.

The interventions under the sub-mission will result in

·         Reduction in Infant Mortality Rate (IMR)

·         Reduction in Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR)

·          Universal access to reproductive health care

·         Convergence of all health related interventions.

The existing institutional mechanism and management systems created and functioning under NRHM will be strengthened to meet the needs of NUHM. Citywise implementation plans will be prepared based on baseline survey and felt need. Urban local bodies will be fully involved in implementation of the scheme.

NUHM aims to improve the health status of the urban population in general, particularly the poor and other disadvantaged sections by facilitating equitable access to quality health care, through a revamped primary public health care system, targeted outreach services and involvement of the community and urban local bodies.

Background

The Union Cabinet in its meeting held in April 2012 has already approved the continuation of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and the other sub-mission under NHM till 31.3.2017.

 

Press Release – State of the Urban Youth India 2012 : Employment, Livelihoods, Skills


youth

 

 

 

Every third person you meet in an Indian city today is a youth.  In about seven years the median age in India will be 29 years, very likely of a city-dweller, making it the youngest country in the world.

The State of the Urban Youth India 2012: Employment, Livelihoods, Skills is published by IRIS Knowledge Foundation (IKF), Mumbai India for the UN-HABITAT Global Urban Youth Research Network (GUYRN) of which IKF is part. It is a first attempt to pull together a data and knowledge base on and of youth in urban India.  The focus of the Report is youth employment and youth livelihoods in urban India.   Through a three-city survey the Report incorporates a youth perspective on the situation of urban youth that is revealed by data and literature.

The Report rolls out a data embedded panorama of urban youth and provides the material for public debate on programmes and policies on youth employment, skill development and livelihoods. It does not aspire to make recommendations, but only to suggest broadly the need for a paradigm shift in addressing the issue of the urban young so that youth are in charge of change.

The Report evolved through discussion among scholars from different fields. In developing the Report the attempt has been to include youth voice and contribution. The field survey was mainly conducted by research students in the social sciences. Of the illustrations in the volume, seven photographs were winning contributions in a youth contest ‘Urban Shutter’ specially organized to generate photographs for the volume.

For printed copies of the Report, pl contact :

Aarti Salve Telang:  aarti@esocialsciences.org

April 10, 2013

* The youth photographers are:  Rahul Manav (pp. 29 and 43) ; Jitu Mohan (p. 79); Jini Nikita (pp. 91 and 119); Himanshu (p. 113) and Akshath (p. 133)

T-131, Tower 1, 3rd Floor, International Infotech Park, Vashi, Navi Mumbai – 400703. India. Tel.: +91-22-6723 1000

The Report can be downloaded below

YOUTH REPORT

 

PRESS RELEASE- #India – House for Every Homeless Families ?


 

PIB Press Release
           
            As per Census 2001, total houseless households in the country stood at 0.45 million.  Census of India 2011 data on houseless households has not been released as on date, therefore, estimation of houseless households as of now and its comparison with the number in 2001 cannot be made at this juncture. However ‘Technical Group on Urban Housing Shortage’ has indicated that 0.53 million Households are in homeless condition in urban areas as of 2012.  This was stated by Shri Ajay Maken, Union Minister of Housing & Urban Poverty Alleviation (HUPA), in the Rajya Sabha today, in a written reply to a question by Shri C. P. Narayanan.
                        The Minister further stated that Land’ and ‘Colonisation’ are State subjects, therefore it is the primary responsibility of State Governments to provide houses/shelters to all citizens. Government of India did not have any scheme for construction of shelters for homeless persons during the Eleventh Five Year Plan. However, in order to complement and supplement the initiatives of State Governments in providing housing for the urban poor, Ministry of Housing & Urban Poverty Alleviation has been implementing following schemes/programmes:
·         Under Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) with its two components Basic Services to Urban Poor (BSUP) and Integrated Housing & Slum Development Programme (IHSDP), 1.57 million Dwelling Units have been sanctioned as on date.
·         The scheme of Rajiv Awas Yojana (RAY) is at a preparatory phase where Slum Free City Planning is being undertaken.
·         Under Affordable Housing in Partnership Scheme (AHP), 11 projects of 2 States viz., Karnataka & Rajasthan have been sanctioned.
·         The Interest Subsidy Scheme for Housing the Urban Poor (ISHUP) is meant to facilitate channelization of credit for the urban poor. As on date, 13,485 beneficiaries have been covered under ISHUP.
                        Under National Urban Livelihood Mission (NULM), ‘Shelters for Urban Homeless’ has been proposed to be taken up during Twelfth Five Year Plan. However, since necessary approvals have not been obtained, no time frame for its finalization can be committed at this juncture.
                     The Minister further stated that given the magnitude of the housing shortage and budgetary constraints of both the Central and State Governments, it is clear that Public Sector efforts will not alone suffice in fulfilling the housing demand. The exact time span to ensure a house to every family in the country cannot be estimated, the Minister added.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#India- Share of Young Children in Urban Development is a Myth


Share of Young Children in Urban Development is a Myth
Friday, February 22, 2013
By Tejeswar Parida
India’s urban population is increasing at a faster rate than its total population. For the first time in the history of demographic record the census of 2011-12 finds that the urban population growth rate is faster than that of the rural areas.
India has now 7,935 towns; an increase of 2,774 since the last Census (2001). Urban population grew to 377 million showing an annual growth rate of 2.76% during 2001-2011. With over 575 million people, India will have 41% percent of its population living in cities and towns by 2030 AD from the present level of 286 million and 28%. Even as the overall decadal population growth rate came down to 17.64% from 21.54% in previous decade, this decade created a history as the urban population grew by 31.80% as compared to 12.18% rural population growth.
When we talk about urban development there are projects and programmes like JNNURUM, BSUP, RAY, UIDSSMT etc to preserve the rights of citizens living in urban poverty. After being launched days back in 2005 December 3rd JNNURM has been the pioneer project for urban development in India. Under UIDSSMT of JNNURM, 807 projects have been approved for 672 towns/cities. Though the quantitative approach seems impressive the ground reality where the concern of every individual child counts are at the back door.
Every eighth urban child in India in the age-group of 0-6 years stays in slums, according to ‘Slums in India – A statistical compendium 2011′ published by the Union government.
“… about 7.6 million children are living in slums in India and they constitute 13.1 per cent of the total child population of the urban areas of the 26 States/ Union Territories reporting slums,” the report compiled by the National Buildings Organisation (NBO) of the Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation says. “Around 2.5 million children in the age group of 0-6 are living in the slum areas of million plus cities in 2001; this constitutes 27.3 per cent of the total child population of these 27 cities,” the report stated.
Half of these 2.5 million children stay in the three major metros of Mumbai, Delhi and Kolkata. While Mumbai has 0.86 million children, Delhi and Kolkata account for 0.3 million and 0.15 million children respectively.
Urban poverty impacts children severely. A child in urban area faces poverty in multiple ways that makes it difficult for him/her to escape from a lifelong cycle of poverty and deprivation. Slums lack basic civic amenities like clean drinking water, sanitation and health facilities. Lack of birth registration, immunisation, safe water, sanitation, safe places to play, well ventilated houses, nutritious food, safety from violence- there is an endless list of denial of rights to the young children living in urban poverty. Studies across the world have shown that lack of proper physical environment leads to impaired growth of children. Demographic dividend is reaped when the youths are healthy and educated enough to be gainfully employed. So poverty not only violates every right of children but also the overall national development. The problems of young children in poverty exist both in rural as well as urban areas but the young children living in urban slums are invisible.
Different studies have been made to explore the possibility of using JNNURM funded initiatives to improve the living conditions and well being of children and young people living in slums in cities across India. All such reports and finds are pointing out non-availability of child friendly environment within the slums in India.
In Odisha context Bhubaneswar and Puri have been selected under JNNURM and Cuttack, Berhampur and Sambalpur towns have been identified to be covered under Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT) in the first phase. And several cases where a child friendly slum in needed are coming into front. Incidents like a four year old young girl in Khan sahi in Cuttack is crying in pain as her hand got burnt are rampant these days. She fell on the choolah while her mother was cooking.
Most people in slums cook just outside their houses or inside the houses which have no ventilation. Children suffer from burns, asthma and breathing problems. The open drain in a slum in Berhampur city cost a young boy his life. The lack of water and sanitation facilities results in various illnesses- diarrhoea, skin rashes and fever. With no proper housing, no drainage or water, no play areas coupled with poverty, the young urban child is denied all basic rights. As a country with nearly 159 million young children, the highest in the world, we are totally immune to the problems faced by our young children living in urban poverty.
Our children are our window of opportunity and we need to ensure that they grow up in a safe and healthy environment. $20 billion approximately is being invested in JNNURM and the country  want to make each paisa count for its young children.

SOURCE -http://www.orissadiary.com/

 

Apply Now- India Youth Fund #mustshare


 

What is the India Youth Fund Window? The India Youth Fund Window is a joint program between UN-Habitat and Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation to support urban youth in India with the aim of advancing the achievement of youth empowerment, the Millennium Development Goals, and the Habitat Agenda. The India Youth Fund Window is a specific funding mechanism under the UN-Habitat Urban Youth Fund for Indian youth financed by the Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation.

 

Who can apply for grant? Youth-led groups based in India where majority (50% and above) of the management and board are aged between 15 and 32 years may apply for the India Youth Fund Window. The youth group has to be registered for at least one year before the application deadline (15th April). Projects must be implemented within an urban area as defined by the Census of India.

 

How do I know whether the place I am planning to do my project is a city or town? For the India Youth Fund Window, an urban area is defined as:

  • All places with a municipality, corporation, cantonment board or notified town area committee etc.

All other places which satisfy the following criteria:

  • Minimum population of 5000;
  • At least 75% of male working population engaged in non-agricultural pursuits; and
  • A density of population of at least 400 persons per sq km (1000 per sq mile).

 

You may also want to use Google or other search engines to check the population of your city or town. The information may also be available with your local administration.

 

What are eligible organizations? Organizations must have been legally registered for at least one year. They must be non-profit, non-government (NGOs or CBOs) and youth-led. They must have a valid bank account. They must involve girls and young women at all levels of decision-making.

 

What is an NGO? A Non-governmental Organization (NGO) is a legally constituted organization that operates independently from any government. The term is usually applied only to organizations that pursue some wider social aim.

 

What is a CBO? Community organizations (sometimes known as community-based organizations) are civil society non-profits that operate within a single local community. Like other nonprofits they are often run on a voluntary basis and are self-funding.

 

What organizations are not eligible? Organizations that carry out religious evangelization and organizations affiliated with political parties are not eligible. Organizations where the majority of staff and board members are not aged between 15-32 years are not eligible.

 

What projects are supported? Youth-led Development involves young people actively creating a better future for themselves and their communities, usually based at the grassroots level and are largely carried out by youth volunteers. Initiatives address a broad range of community needs such as health, employment, access to affordable housing, secure land tenure, safer cities and participation in decision-making. The objective of the project is also to develop valuable skills of management, teamwork etc among young people and boost their ability to acquire jobs and participate actively in society.

 

Is it compulsory for my organization to involve girls and young women? Yes! The Urban Youth Fund aims for gender equality and applicant organizations should therefore engage both female and male youth equally in the implementation of the project and among the beneficiaries. Organizations that do not involve girls and young women are not eligible.

 

What is the amount of the grants? Youth-led projects may receive grants of up to INR 8 Lacs.

 

How much does it cost to apply? Nothing! The India Youth Fund Window will not require you to pay any fee during the entire process of your application.

 

Can I apply for more than one project? No! Organizations can submit only one application for each annual deadline. Organizations may however, apply for the Fund the following year if not successful. Organizations that apply for more than one project will be disqualified.

 

When and where will the results be announced? The results will be announced on the Urban Youth Fund website: www.unhabitat.org/youthfund and the Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation website:www.nsfoundation.co.in on before 15th October (within six months of the application deadline). Successful applicants will be individually notified by e-mail.

 

How do I apply for a Fund grant? The application form is available online at http://unhabitatyouthfund.org. To access it, you have to first register on the front page, and then download the application guidelines and application form.

 

 

#India- Urban poor to be identified on vulnerabilities


By , TNN | Jan 14, 2013, 04.36 AM IST

NEW DELHI: The urban poor will now be identified on the basis of social, economic and occupational vulnerabilities as the housing and poverty alleviation ministry has decided to junk the Planning Commission‘s income benchmark.

As of now, families earning below Rs 4,824 a month are put in the bracket of urban poor.

The move comes as the ministry is finding it difficult to identify beneficiaries in metropolises and other cities, where few families earn below the BPL cutoff while many of them live in vulnerable conditions.

It has also been noticed that income certificates are forged or are being procured after bribing officials.

As the socio-economic census is going on across the country, the ministry is working on a mechanism according to which urban poor will be defined according to people’s vulnerabilities. Under the mechanism, families will be divided into two groups — those automatically included the other automatically excluded — in the poverty bracket.

Those automatically included in the poverty bracket will be the homeless and jobless. Automatically excluded will be families with a pakka house, motor vehicle or electronic appliances such as air-conditioner or refrigerator.

Those included will be graded by the ministry on the basis of economic, social, occupational and housing vulnerabilities. Based on data from the caste census, families will be graded and assigned points according to their needs.

“The formula will help in identifying poor in terms of vulnerabilities and government schemes will target the vulnerable group. It will result in better targeting,” housing and urban poverty alleviation minister Ajay Makentold TOI, adding that the identification of urban poor will be based on the recommendations of the Hashim committee.

“Those living in slums will automatically be eligible for benefits under the slum-rehabilitation scheme,” the minister said.

The new mechanism is also aimed at ensuring distribution of benefits of government schemes to city-specific “vulnerable” basket as per the specific needs in a particular city.

If a family scores very high on the housing vulnerability index, it would be given priority under slum upgradation schemes and Rajiv Awas Yojana, an official said.

Once the census is complete, the city-specific urban poor basket will be ready. “We will take it up with other ministries also to adopt the new criteria,” Maken said.

 

__._,_.___

 

60% rural India lives on less than Rs 35 a day


May 3, 2012, PTI

Around 60 per cent of India’s rural population lives on less than Rs 35 a day and nearly as many in cities live on Rs 66 a day, reveals a government survey on income and expenditure.

“In terms of average per capita daily expenditure, it comes out to be about Rs 35 in rural and Rs 66 in urban India.

Around 60 per cent of the population live with these expenditures or less in rural and urban areas,” said Director General of National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO) J Dash in his preface to the report.

According to the 66th round of National Sample Survey (NSS) carried out between July 2009 and June 2010, all India average monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE) in rural areas was Rs 1,054 and urban areas Rs 1,984.

The survey also pointed out that 10 per cent of the population at the lowest rung in rural areas lives on Rs 15 a day, while in urban areas the figure is only a shade better at Rs 20 day.

“The poorest 10 per cent of India’s rural population had an average MPCE of Rs 453. The poorest 10 per cent of the urban population had an average MPCE of Rs 599”, it said.

The NSSO survey also revealed that average MPCE in rural areas was lowest in Bihar and Chhattisgarh at around Rs 780 followed by Orissa and Jharkhand at Rs 820.

Among other states, Kerala has the highest rural MPCE at 1,835 followed by Punjab and Haryana at Rs 1,649 and Rs 1,510 respectively. The the highest urban MCPE was in Maharashtra at Rs 2,437 followed by Kerala at Rs 2,413 and Haryana at Rs 2,321. It was lowest in Bihar at Rs 1,238. The median level of MCPE was Rs 895 in rural and Rs 1,502 in urban India, indicating consumption level of majority of population.

According to the study, food was estimated to account about 57 per cent of the value of the average rural Indian household consumption during 2009-10 whereas it was 44 per cent in cities. — PTI

Government survey

n The 66th round of National Sample Survey (NSS) carried out between July 2009 and June 2010

n It says all India average monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE) in rural areas was Rs 1,054 and urban areas Rs 1,984

n The survey also pointed out 10 per cent of the population at the lowest rung in rural areas lives on Rs 15 a day, while in urban areas the figure is only a shade better at Rs 20 day

SC: Build night shelters in all govt hospitals


Central Lawn of AIIMS

Image via Wikipedia

NEW DELHI: The Supreme Court last week  urged the Delhi government to take steps to set up night shelters in and around all government hospitals in the city to protect patients and relatives from the biting cold and expressed happiness over the prompt action taken by All India Institute of Medical Sciences in this regard.

A bench of Justices Dalveer Bhandari and Dipak Misra said poor people requiring specialized treatment came to Delhi from all over the country.

The difficulty is the inadequacy of infrastructure available at the hospitals. Delhi probably needs many more AIIMS like hospitals to cater to people coming to Delhi from all over India. And at this time of the year, the government must take steps to protect and preserve human lives from biting cold by building night shelters in all government hospitals in the city,” the bench said.

The joint inspection of night shelters carried out by the court commissioners and the officials of Delhi Urban Shelter Improvement Board ( DUSIB) showed that many of those using the night shelters were old and destitute, and were suffering from critical illnesses in the absence of health care.

The SC asked Delhi government to inspect all the night shelters, identify those needing medical help and admit those in government hospitals who needed constant medical attention.

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