Stand up for the Tibet Pledge #mustread #mustshare


 

15 August 2012

Dear Friends,

This is a crucial moment. Please help us to double support for Stand Up for Tibet.

TsewangNorbu.jpeg

One year ago 29-year old monk Tsewang Norbu set light to himself and died in Tawu, eastern Tibet. Although not the first self-immolation in Tibet – Tapey, in February 2009 was followed two years later by Phuntsok in March 2011 –this was our first realization that those fiery protests were not isolated incidents, and that what we were witnessing unfold in Tibet was a tragedy of enormous proportions.

Unbelievably, there have now been almost 50 confirmed self-immolations in Tibet; a staggering 36 since 1 January 2012 and five in the past 10 days alone. At least 39 of all these protestors have died from their burns.

Something different is happening in Tibet. Over 60 years of occupation, periods of Tibetan resistance have been crushed by China’s military forces. But trying to stop individuals who are determined to set light to themselves must be akin to trying to stop grains of sand running through their fingers. And more than that, China is also now discovering that its military might is unable to prevent mass gatherings of Tibetans, whether they are praying for those self-immolating or engaging in more challenging acts of protest.

On Monday several Tibetans were brutally beaten, one possibly fatally, after a protest erupted in the immediate aftermath of the twin self-immolations by Tashi and Lungtok in Ngaba, Amdo. And as I write this message, a mass demonstration is taking place in Rebkong, Amdo, with several hundred Tibetans gathered outside the police station to protest against the unprovoked beating of four Tibetans by drunken police.

 

I’m writing to ask that you continue to stand with Tibet. Although we feel heartbroken by the news of each passing self-immolation, the Tibetan people need our support now more than ever. We mustn’t lose focus. Now is the time to double our efforts, in raising awareness and pressing for political action, because we’re making an impact. 
Tibetans in Tibet are not alone. They have your support and your pledge to Stand Up for Tibet. And the Tibet movement has made important progress towards our main objectives.

Rebkongprotest.jpg

* Tibet Groups around the world have delivered your pledge and worked hard to press governments to publicly express concernMany of the world’s most influential governments have spoken out, including at sessions of the United Nations Human Rights Council. In early September, as the United Nations General Assembly and Human Rights Council prepare to meet, we’ll be calling for an International Advocacy Day and will send you more details soon.

 

* Our demand for governments to act together for Tibet is gradually gaining traction. We were delighted to see that US Congressmen Frank Wolf and James McGovern wrote to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this week, calling for “stronger, more coordinated, visible international diplomatic steps with regard to the People’s Republic of China’s policies and practices towards Tibetans.” Read the full letter here.

* A number of key governments have strongly pressed China allow access to the region, including the European Union and Australia. China has agreed that the UN Human Rights Commissioner can visit Tibet as part of a wider visit to China, but no dates have been agreed. Online advocacy group Avaaz joined this campaign and nearly 700,000 people signed an appeal for governments to demand urgent access to Tibet.

* Tibet Groups have generated significant media coverage of the self-immolations, and made a huge effort to raise public awareness, staging coordinated actions and protests around the globe on a regular basis over the last 12 months.

On this anniversary of Tsewang Norbu’s self-immolation, I am writing to ask each and every one of you to undertake to get one more person to sign the Stand Up for Tibet pledge, and help us to double the support for Tibetans in Tibet to more than 100,000 people. Let’s respond to this rapid increase in self-immolations in Tibet with a huge increase in those pledging to take action, to help Tibetans realise their dreams for freedom and for the return of His Holiness to Tibet.

Many, many thanks for your support,

Alison Reynolds
Executive Director, International Tibet Network Secretariat

The second image shows protests in Rebkong, Tibet on 14 August 2012. The banner reads “The atrocity committed by the Administration’s People’s Armed Police to the masses”

 

Appeal for Tibetan writer Tsering Woeser


Allow Woeser the freedom to express and to travel”

As individuals from Asia who have received the Prince Claus Award in past years, we deeply regret that Tsering Woeser, the Tibetan writer and historian, has been prevented from receiving the Prince Claus Award for 2011 in Beijing by the Chinese authorities. Not only was Woeser denied the opportunity to receive the award from the Dutch Ambassador to China, her movements within Beijing have been restricted.

The Prince Claus Award for 2011 was given to Woeser as a ‘cultural pioneer’ who uses poetry and social media to highlight the challenges faced by the Tibetan people. She was recognised for speaking on behalf of “those who are silenced and oppressed, for her compelling combination of literary quality and political reportage, for recording, articulating and supporting Tibetan culture.”

We, five past recipients of the Prince Claus Award from Asia, believe that Tsering Woeser represents the finest ideals of the human spirit, represented in her intellectual independence and courage to speak out in the face of danger. We support Woeser’s yearning for open society and respect her all the more for remaining located in Beijing, in an attempt to bring about change from within. Woeser’s deep humanity is revealed in her recent appeal against the self-immolations that are occurring in and around Tibet.

We demand that the Chinese authorities in Beijing allow Woeser to receive the Prince Claus Award in an open ceremony. We also ask that the restrictions on her blogs and her poetry be lifted, as also restrictions on her freedom of travel inside and outside the country.

Signed by Prince Claus laureates: Arif Hasan (Karachi, Pakistan), Ganesh Devy (Vadodara, India), Jyotindra Jain (New Delhi, India), Kanak Mani Dixit (Kathmandu, Nepal) and Mehrdad Oskouei (Tehran, Iran).

Issued in Kathmandu, 29 March 2012

Contact: Kanak Mani Dixit, +977-9851053209, dixitkanak@yahoo.com

Images falling from Tibet shows scenes of Chinese crackdown in Serta


DHARAMSHALA, February 4-Amidst Chinese censorship and propaganda, a series of black mailed graphic images from the Tibetan region of Serta unveils the ongoing crackdown in the Tibetan region.
The Director of the Students for Free Tibet, India, Dorje Tseten told the media that the series of recent photos from Serta shows that China has not been telling the truth about the demonstrations in recent weeks.

“The Chinese government says like those protestors were shot on self defense but in the picture we can clearly see the protestors are like unarmed, they are protesting with non-violent protest and then police crackdown the protest very brutally and kill Tibetans,” Dorje Tseten said, adding that the photos show Chinese riot police brutally beating up the unarmed Tibetan demonstrators, and dragging down to the police station in the region.

While the Tibetan exile world is being disturbed with the growing number of deaths in protests against the Chinese rule over Tibet, the Beijing government has been fabricating the truth-blaming the Tibetan demonstrators and using the normal faulty forceful security measures in Tibet.

Lobsang Sangay, the Tibetan prime minister has also said ‘he is getting alarmed’ by the growing number of Chinese military personnel moving into the Tibetan regions of Ngaba, Serta, Golok, and so called Tibetan Autonomous Region.

Following the Chinese open fire in three incidents, Tibetans believe that at least a dozen got killed and dozens got wounded in recent weeks.

Tibet Expert at Columbia University, Robbie Barnett said that the recent protests in Tibet signal what it could be after the Dalai Lama era.

“If the Dalai Lama dies without any resolution, it will take a half century to build trust again,” he explaining that the Dalai Lama’s death in exile would be so significant to Tibetans it could ruin prospects for a reasonable Tibetan-Chinese relationship.

According to exile sources, 17 Tibetans in Tibet have burned themselves, calling for freedom in Tibet, and return of the Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama from exile.

The whole area of Tibet known as the roof of the world is being sealed off by the Chinese police road check points on the roads from China as well as from Nepal, and armed Chinese soldiers manning the day to day life of the Tibetans inside Tibet.

The Dharamshala based members of the Tibetan Parliament will sit on a day-long fast on coming Wednesday, and Tibetans through out the world have also vowed to do the same on the same day to show solidarity and support to the plight of people inside Tibet.

Declaring to forego the upcoming Tibetan New Year, Tibetans and Tibetan supporters in more than 100 cities across the world are going to fast on the first day of the Tibetan New Year which falls on February 22.

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