#Russia -#Censorship f’Internet blacklist law takes effect #FOS #FOE


Children using a computer

Nov 1, 2012  BBC

A law that aims to protect children from harmful internet content by allowing the government to take sites offline has taken effect in Russia.

The authorities are now able to blacklist and force offline certain websites without a trial.

The law was approved by both houses of parliament and signed by President Vladimir Putin in July.

Human rights groups have said the legislation might increase censorship in the country.

The law is the amendment to the current Act for Information.

The authorities say the goal is to protect minors from websites featuring sexual abuse of children, offering details about how to commit suicide, encouraging users to take drugs and sites that solicit children for pornography.

If the websites themselves cannot be shut down, internet service providers (ISPs) and web hosting companies can be forced to block access to the offending material.

It will be [an attack on] the freedom of speech on the internet”

Yuri VdovinCitizens’ Watch

Critics have described it another attempt by President Vladimir Putin to exercise control over the population.

“Of course there are websites that should not be accessible to children, but I don’t think it will be limited to that,” Yuri Vdovin, vice-president of Citizens’ Watch, a human rights organisation based in Saint-Petersburg, told the BBC.

“The government will start closing other sites – any democracy-oriented sites are at risk of being taken offline.

“It will be [an attack on] the freedom of speech on the internet.”

Mr Vdovin said that to close a website, the government would simply have to say that its content was “harmful to children”.

“But there are lots of harmful websites out there already, for example, fascist sites – and they could have easily been closed down by now – but no, [the government] doesn’t care, there are no attempts to do so,” he added.

A risk for websites?

Besides NGOs and human rights campaigners, websites including the Russian search engine giant Yandex, social media portal Mail.ru and the Russian-language version of Wikipedia have all protested against the law.

Screengrab of Russian Wikipedia pageThe Russian version of Wikipedia went dark for a day in protest at the law in July

The latter, for instance, took its content offline for a day ahead of the vote in July, claiming the law “could lead to the creation of extra-judicial censorship of the entire internet in Russia, including banning access to Wikipedia in the Russian language”.

Yandex temporarily crossed out the word “everything” in its “everything will be found” logo.

“The way the new law will work depends on the enforcement practice,” said a spokesman.

“Yandex, along with other key Russian market players, is ready to discuss with lawmakers the way it is going to work.”

In July, the Russian social networking site Vkontakte posted messages on users’ homepages warning that the law posed a risk to its future.

However, the country’s telecom minister Nikolai Nikiforov, suggested that such concerns were overblown when he spoke at the NeForum blogging conference this week.

“Internet has always been a free territory,” he said, according to a reportby Russian news agency Tass.

“The government is not aimed at enforcing censorship there. LiveJournal, YouTube and Facebook showcase socially responsible companies.

“That means that they will be blocked only if they refuse to follow Russian laws, which is unlikely, in my opinion.

 

 

Appeal from a straight, married, arrested for supporting gay rights ?


Dear  Friends

My name is Sergey and I’m an attorney in Russia. I’m straight – happily married for 16 years – and until last week I would not have been called an “activist”.   But in just five days I will got to court, fined and maybe even thrown in jail because I held up a banner in Saint Petersburg and told the truth:

“A dear family friend is lesbian. My wife and I love and respect her … and her family is just as equal as ours.”

I was among the first to be arrested, but thousands more could follow.  As I write this, Russian officials are fast tracking a plan to extend Saint Petersburg’s “gay propaganda” law to the entire country.

I believe that it should never be illegal to defend the dignity of friends and family.  Will you sign and share my urgent letter to Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin asking him to denounce this law before my trial? He has the power to end this, but we have only a few days to build the massive outcry that will force him to pay attention: 

www.allout.org/standwithsergey

Supporters of the law claim that it would “protect children,” but my arrest makes clear the real intention.  This law is really about making lesbian, gay, bi and trans (LGBT) people disappear in Russia’s second largest city. And not just LGBT people – the law will muzzle people like me, straight people who care about our LGBT friends and family. Now that lawmakers in the Duma (the federal legislature) are debating a version of the law, this despicable law could go national – unless we fight it now.

The world, and many of my fellow Russians, are starting to wake up to the idiocy of this law. From the Russian Human Rights Ombudsman, to the Presidential Human Rights Council, more figures are stepping up to tell Russia how this law is a flagrant violation of human rights. The law is being challenged in the courts, and it’s losing popularity as it reminds people of a very ugly part of our history when people were silenced – or worse – for speaking their mind. The law also breaks just about every international human rights treaty obligation that our country is a party to.

That’s why I’m appealing to the one person whose influence over the political process in Russia could help us annul this unconstitutional law in St. Petersburg, and make sure it isn’t rolled out nationwide – Prime Minister Putin. Sign now, then share my letter to the prime minister with everyone you can – let’s make sure he knows the whole world is watching:

www.allout.org/standwithsergey

Thanks for your support,

Sergey Kondrashov
Independent lawyer in Saint-Petersburg

SOURCES:

Arrests for Violation of St. Petersburg Anti-Gay Law
www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,826199,00.html

Arrests Under New Anti-Gay Law Continue
www.themoscowtimes.com/news/article/arrests-under-new-anti-gay-law-continue/456320.html

LGBT Russians stand up and speak out: “We will not be silenced!” (VIDEO)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztHZK2ZrlQM

Russia : Don’t Go There. We Will Not Be Silenced


Lawmakers in Russia just passed a draconian censorship law that would impose stiff fines for anything construed as “the promotion of homosexuality” in Saint Petersburg, Russia‘s second largest city. Reading, writing, speaking or reporting on anything related to gay, lesbian bi or trans (LGBT) people would become a criminal act. This ban on “promotion” would also target Pride parades, literature, theater, or NGOs that openly serve LGBT people.

All Out, a community of almost a million people around the world fighting for full equality, made a little video to send the Governor a message. Pass this law – We Won’t Go There.

Archives

Kractivism-Gonaimate Videos

Protest to Arrest

Faking Democracy- Free Irom Sharmila Now

Faking Democracy- Repression Anti- Nuke activists

JAPA- MUSICAL ACTIVISM

Kamayaninumerouno – Youtube Channel

UID-UNIQUE ?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6,228 other followers

Top Rated

Blog Stats

  • 1,847,745 hits

Archives

September 2021
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
%d bloggers like this: