Veteran Film Actor Pran conferred the Dadasaheb Phalke Award for the year 2012


 


Shri Pran Krishan Sikand, popularly known as Pran, the veteran film actor, has been conferred the Dadasaheb Phalke Award for the year 2012. He is the 44th Dada Saheb Phalke Award Winner. The award is conferred by the Government of India for outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian Cinema. The award consists of a Swarn Kamal, a cash prize of Rs.10 lakhs and a shawl. The award is given on the basis of recommendations of a Committee of eminent persons.
Shri Pran has given sterling performances in many films along with Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand and Raj Kapoor in 1950s and 60s. Pran’s performanceshave received acclaim in films like Azaad, Madhumati, Devdas, Dil Diya Dard Liya, Ram Aur Shyam and Aadmi, Ziddi, Munimji, Amar Deep, Jab Pyar Kisi Se Hota Hai, Aah, Chori Chori, Jagte Raho, Chhalia, Jis Desh Men Ganga Behti Hai. The list is long.
Born in the year 1920 in Delhi, Shri Pran started his career way back in 1940. He first ventured into photography but a chance meeting with a film producer got him his first role in a film called Yamla Jat. Shri Pran acted in several films, his base being Lahore in undivided India. His career experienced a brief pause due to partition in 1947. Subsequently he moved to Bombay. With the help of the famous writer Saadat Hasan Manto and actor Shyam, Pran got a break in the Bombay Talkies film Ziddi which had Dev Anand in the lead role. The film Ziddi brought him to limelight in the Bombay film industry and then there was no turning back.
His impressive performances have bestowed an entirely unique new dimension to the negative and character roles in Hindi cinema. His contribution to mainstream Hindi cinema is well recognized, assuring him the place of one of the most illustrious and celebrated actors of Indian film industry. His career spanned several decades. He has acted in over 400 films and in each one of them, he brought new mannerism and style, holding the audience spell bound by his acting.
Shri Pran is a recipient of a number of film awards including the Filmfare Award. He was also honoured with the Padma Bhushan.

 

#India- Theatre fest takes hit, plays by two Pakistani groups cancelled


Dipanita Nath : New Delhi, Fri Jan 18 2013, 02:40 hrs

After hockey players from Pakistan returned home from India following tensions over the killing of two Indian soldiers , two Pakistani theatre groups felt the diplomatic ripples on Thursday.

Fearing trouble, the National School of Drama, which organises the annual theatre festival Bharat Rang Mahotsav (BRM), cancelled shows by NAPA Repertory Theatre and Ajoka Theatre. Both were due to stage plays on Saadat Hasan Manto, who chronicled the horrors of Partition and supported a tolerant society.

The curtains came down on NAPA a few hours before it was to stage Mantorama, directed by Sunil Shankar, at Kamani auditorium Thursday.

“The Ministry of Culture was apprehensive that disruptive elements might not allow the play to proceed smoothly. They do not want the audience to be hurt or injured and have decided to withdraw the two shows,” said NSD chairperson Amal Allana.

BRM is considered Asia’s largest theatre festival and features a selection of Indian and foreign productions. Pakistani troupes have always been a part of the line-up, with Ajoka having taken part more than five times.

The warning bells rang Wednesday, when Ajoka’s Kaun Hai Yeh Gustakh, which was to be presented at Ravindra Manch in Jaipur as part of a parallel festival, was cancelled. The play, directed by Madeeha Gauhar, revolves around events after Manto’s migration to Pakistan.

“It would have been held at a public venue in Jaipur and the state government asked us not to proceed with it. Both groups have performed at previous editions of BRM but we had to keep the safety of the audience in mind,” Allana said. “The groups have not been banned or censored, only (shows) cancelled.”

 

Celebrating 100 years of Faiz and Manto- at TISS, Mumbai


Inline image 1– M

Dear  Friends,

It is a nice co-incidence that this year (2012) is the birth centenary of two of the greatest creative writers that twentieth century has produced  – Faiz Ahmed Faiz and Saadat Hasan Manto. It is worth remembering that these writers lived and worked through turbulent and difficult times personally as well as socially, politically. Although the times have changed and the challenges have taken a new form, the relevance of the ideas and values that these people worked and stood for are worth revisiting. Hence we thought it would be a good idea if we could organize something to not only remember and underscore the relevance of those dreams and ideas shared by these people but also to expose and acquaint ourselves with the several such thinkers and romantics who dreamt of a better world.

It is not just an exercise in celebration of their uniqueness but also committing ourselves to the struggle for a more equal world, to rework the world in favor of the ‘wretched of the earth’.

We are well aware that this exercise maybe found lacking in its direct relationship with the core business of education, but as Anthony O’Hear says, engaging with the sphere of literature and art is integral to the idea of ‘education for goodness in a changing world’.


Please join us for the following
सबसे खतरनाक होता हैं, मुर्दा शांति से भर जाना
ना होना तड़प का, सब कुछ सहन कर जाना
घर से निकलना काम पर, काम से घर आ जाना
सबसे खतरनाक होता हैं हमारे सपनो का मर जाना

– अवतार सिंह पाश 

…eager to hear many more such great pieces tomorrow.
The process of unearthing such writers and reliving their thoughts will begin with sharing what each one of us know and hold dear.
Please bring in pieces that inspire you (any language) and share them.
Poetry Reading Session
Date: 22 May (Tuesday) 2012
Time: 6:30 – 8:00 pm
Venue: Quadrangle, TISS Campus, Deonar
ALL ARE INVITED
1. Poetry Reading – 22 May, 6.30-8.00 PM, Quadrangle, TISS Campus (Opposite Deonar bus depot, Chembur)
Poems with social or political relevance in any language would be welcome.
2. A Talk on Faiz Ahmed Faiz  – 26 May, 6:00 – 7:30 pm, Common Room, TISS Campus (Opposite Deonar bus depot, Chembur)
SpeakerProf. Zaheer Ali


3. Screening of Kali Shalwar, the film based on Manto’s story by the same title followed by a discussion.
30 May, 6 PM, Common room, TISS Campus 
(Opposite Deonar bus depot, Chembur)

Please call – 08237680474 or             09911118081       for further details.
in solidarity
Manish Jain, Nandini Manjrekar, Saqib Khan, Yogender Dutt and Vivek Vellanki

Sunday Reading–Who’s afraid of Saadat Hasan Manto?


The Union of India is eager to embrace the great writer, whose 100th birthday falls on this week, as one of its own. But how would Manto have looked at India had he stayed on? By Garga Chatterjee


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The left-wing student organization I belonged to in my college days in Kolkata used to have a poster exhibition every year. This exhibition has begun to take place every year after the 1992 demolition of the Babri structure. One of them had those memorable words calligraphied red-black in a typical Bengali left-wing style – “The child noticed the coagulated blood on the road, pulled at his mother’s sleeve and said, ‘Look, ma, jelly’.” That, I discovered, was a fragment of a very short ‘story’; and to read the rest, I had to go to Manto.

Why did he leave Bombay? India would have been so much of a ‘natural’ home for him, they say

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There is a lot of hushed and not-so-hushed lamentation in this year of Saadat Hasan Manto‘s birth centenary. Why did he leave Bombay? India would have been so much of a ‘natural’ home for him, they say. Somewhere between pronunciations such as these, so characteristic of the self-congratulatory strain of elite public-secularism and a second-hand appreciation of Manto’s raw exposition of the chasm between our private and public lives, somewhere between those things lies the attitude with which we in India look at Manto. The Anglicized literati and their patron, the Indian Union, wants to own Saadat Hasan Manto. They are masters at making cages for living writers – some gilded, others iron-made. Some cages become sarkari mausoleums after the writer’s death. Zoo tigers do not bite, generally. Clearly, the enthusiasm of some folks on this side of owning Manto comes from a hope that sooner or later, a suitably golden cage could be made for him in the Union of India, for us to cheer and clap at. But I am not so sure.

The Anglicized literati of India want to own Saadat Hasan Manto. They are masters at making cages for living writers

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Today, in Delhi and other places, Manto is dramatized, commemorated, written and read, largely in English. Urdu’s currency as one of the pervasive languages of the common public sphere (and not ‘qaumi’ affairs) of the Upper Gangetic plain has seen progressive ruin. Read primarily in English, would Manto resign himself to having a smaller following than, say, Chetan Bhagat? Would Manto have loved this loss of readership, would he have wanted to be primarily remembered for getting a Filmfare award for “lifetime achievement” in writing stories for Hindi movies? I am not so sure. He might have written about the gosht the Union would serve up, not only mazhabi gosht, but gosht from a thousand faultlines. He might have written about the garam gosht cooked up in Delhi in 1984, when Sikhs were massacred on that city’s streets, or about the gosht of Muslims burned and killed in Ahmedabad in 2002, if he lived to be 90 years old. Would he, a “Muslim” writer in our times, not be accused of writing only against “Hindu” violence? I am not so sure. He certainly would have written about a lot of gosht served up in East Pakistan in 1971. He certainly wouldn’t have had a postage stamp of the kind issued in 2005 with his image on it. Dying young has its benefits.

Read primarily in English, would Manto resign himself to having a smaller following than, say, Chetan Bhagat?

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He might have looked at the Saltoro range and the slow-killing heights of Siachen. He might have peered into that deathly whiteness, peered deep into it and among the frostbitten parts of the limbs would have located the new coordinates of Toba Tek Singh. Not content with “obscenity”, there might have been calls for him to be charged with sedition. That would have been true, irrespective of his leaving Bombay or not. He would have continued to write about the sensuality that permeates life in the Indian Subcontinent. Invariably, they would have intersected with more than one faith, belief and god(s), for they too pervade public life in the Union of India. Like Maqbul Fida Hussain, that sterling admirer of the goddess Durga who liberated her from the patently mid-19th century blouse-clad look, re-imagining the holy mother in her naked matriarchal glory, Manto’s run-ins with “public sensibilities” might just have been enough to eject him from Bombay. Almost surely, as it happened with MF Hussain, a robust on-the-ground counter to hate-mongerers would have been found wanting. Hardly being ‘Pak’, in the long run, perhaps he would have been easily pushed out of Pakistan also, where he “had only seen five or six times before as a British subject”.

Read more here

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