#India – Farms robbed of water, farmers livelihood


Thursday, May 30, 2013, 7:49 IST | Agency: DNA
Yogesh Pawar
High-powered committee on water reallocates 1983.43 million cubic metres of water from 51 irrigation projects to coal-fired power plants, finds a study conducted by non-profit organisation Prayas.
A high-powered committee on water seems more interested in diverting water from irrigation to highly water-intensive coal fired power plants. This, despite the stress that this reallocation places on drought-prone regions in the state.
This revelation has been made by an analytical report put out by non-profit organisation, Prayas, on the basis of the minutes of meetings that high-powered committees have held over a decade. Such committees consists of ministers and bureaucrats.
Drying up fields
Terming the committee’s decisions as ‘opaque and undemocratic’, the report states that it had reallocated 1983.43million cubic metres of water from 51 irrigation projects for non-irrigation purposes, thus reducing irrigation potential by 3.23lakh hectares.
Analysis of minutes of meetings shows that of the total water reallocated by the panel, 54% was allotted for domestic purpose while 46% was for industrial purpose. Besides demand for drinking water, industrial water demands are equally responsible for reduction of water for irrigation. This debunks the general belief that industry requires less water and water allocated to it shouldn’t cause much of an adverse impact.
Of the total water allocated for domestic use, 96.94% was routed to municipal corporations in cities like Mumbai, Pune, Nashik and Nagpur. Of the rest, 1.75% went to municipal councils with 0.88% to rural pockets and 0.42% diverted to other schemes like water supply to educational institutions. It is apparent that private companies, including power plants and special economic zones, used the committee’s regime most effectively in availing water reservations.
Of the total water reserved by the committee for industries, a maximum share of 64% is allocated to thermal power plants. Of the 15 power plants which demanded and got water reservation from the panel, 13 are privately owned.
Besides power plants, the panel allowed water to be reserved for Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (19%) and special economic zones (14%).
Dodging the law
The report states that the committee did not consider farmers’ interests and even sidetracked the state watchdog – Maharashtra Water Resources Regulatory Authority.
“…this would require adherence to law and the decisions would have to be open, transparent, systematic, and rational with consideration of implications of these decisions on local beneficiaries”, the report mentions.
The report states that involvement of the regulator would make public hearings mandatory, spurring exchanging of ideas on looking at alternative sources of water for industries.
The report notes that thermal power plants, which require cooling, were provided with water-based coolers instead of air-based coolers which would have help scrimp on water.
Here’s how the report explanains this anomaly. “It would not have allowed the functionaries in the committee to make arbitrary decision favouring certain interested parties…
Activists filed two petitions in the high court and the regulatory body, challenging the committee’s decisions to divert water from a couple of irrigation projects for non-irrigation purposes. However, the state government did not await the verdict.
“The illegal decisions were legalised… using a weapon of ordinance… As a result, farmers lost their right to challenge the illegal decisions forever…” says the report. “The water reallocation from irrigation projects to non-irrigation is grabbing of water resources for industries and big cities at the cost of livelihoods of farmers.”
Advantage politics
The report points out how the allocation policy has been captured by dominant political forces emerging from rapid urbanisation and industrialisation. “These forces are capturing the policy space and thereby the vital natural resources like water at the cost of life and livelihoods of the rural farming community. There is an urgent need to close the gaps in the policy framework and evolve strong regulatory mechanisms to create a counter-political force capable of protecting the interests of the disadvantaged sections of the society,” it recommends.

 

Apply Now- India Youth Fund #mustshare


 

What is the India Youth Fund Window? The India Youth Fund Window is a joint program between UN-Habitat and Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation to support urban youth in India with the aim of advancing the achievement of youth empowerment, the Millennium Development Goals, and the Habitat Agenda. The India Youth Fund Window is a specific funding mechanism under the UN-Habitat Urban Youth Fund for Indian youth financed by the Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation.

 

Who can apply for grant? Youth-led groups based in India where majority (50% and above) of the management and board are aged between 15 and 32 years may apply for the India Youth Fund Window. The youth group has to be registered for at least one year before the application deadline (15th April). Projects must be implemented within an urban area as defined by the Census of India.

 

How do I know whether the place I am planning to do my project is a city or town? For the India Youth Fund Window, an urban area is defined as:

  • All places with a municipality, corporation, cantonment board or notified town area committee etc.

All other places which satisfy the following criteria:

  • Minimum population of 5000;
  • At least 75% of male working population engaged in non-agricultural pursuits; and
  • A density of population of at least 400 persons per sq km (1000 per sq mile).

 

You may also want to use Google or other search engines to check the population of your city or town. The information may also be available with your local administration.

 

What are eligible organizations? Organizations must have been legally registered for at least one year. They must be non-profit, non-government (NGOs or CBOs) and youth-led. They must have a valid bank account. They must involve girls and young women at all levels of decision-making.

 

What is an NGO? A Non-governmental Organization (NGO) is a legally constituted organization that operates independently from any government. The term is usually applied only to organizations that pursue some wider social aim.

 

What is a CBO? Community organizations (sometimes known as community-based organizations) are civil society non-profits that operate within a single local community. Like other nonprofits they are often run on a voluntary basis and are self-funding.

 

What organizations are not eligible? Organizations that carry out religious evangelization and organizations affiliated with political parties are not eligible. Organizations where the majority of staff and board members are not aged between 15-32 years are not eligible.

 

What projects are supported? Youth-led Development involves young people actively creating a better future for themselves and their communities, usually based at the grassroots level and are largely carried out by youth volunteers. Initiatives address a broad range of community needs such as health, employment, access to affordable housing, secure land tenure, safer cities and participation in decision-making. The objective of the project is also to develop valuable skills of management, teamwork etc among young people and boost their ability to acquire jobs and participate actively in society.

 

Is it compulsory for my organization to involve girls and young women? Yes! The Urban Youth Fund aims for gender equality and applicant organizations should therefore engage both female and male youth equally in the implementation of the project and among the beneficiaries. Organizations that do not involve girls and young women are not eligible.

 

What is the amount of the grants? Youth-led projects may receive grants of up to INR 8 Lacs.

 

How much does it cost to apply? Nothing! The India Youth Fund Window will not require you to pay any fee during the entire process of your application.

 

Can I apply for more than one project? No! Organizations can submit only one application for each annual deadline. Organizations may however, apply for the Fund the following year if not successful. Organizations that apply for more than one project will be disqualified.

 

When and where will the results be announced? The results will be announced on the Urban Youth Fund website: www.unhabitat.org/youthfund and the Narotam Sekhsaria Foundation website:www.nsfoundation.co.in on before 15th October (within six months of the application deadline). Successful applicants will be individually notified by e-mail.

 

How do I apply for a Fund grant? The application form is available online at http://unhabitatyouthfund.org. To access it, you have to first register on the front page, and then download the application guidelines and application form.

 

 

# India – Applications invited for Radio stations


 ( ANY NGO, SOCIETY IF YOU GET IT,  THEN EMPLOY ME 🙂

Ministry of Information & Broadcasting, Government of India

radio

Registered User’s should Sign in for using the site

In December 2002, the Government of India approved a policy for the grant of licenses for setting up of Community Radio Stations to well established educational institutions including IITs/IIMs.

The matter has been reconsidered and the Government has now decided to broad base the policy by bringing ‘Non-profit’ organisations like civil society and voluntary organisations etc under its ambit in order to allow greater participation by the civil society on issues relating to development & social change.

There are several stages to the Application process as well that needs to be kept in mind.

  • Step 1: Filling up the Application Form and submitting the requisite documents to the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (Community Radio Station Cell), Shastri Bhawan, New Delhi. (The list of documents will be highlighted below/ in a foot note)

  • Step 2: Applying to the Wireless Planning & Coordination Wing (WPC) for :(i) Frequency Allocation;

    (ii)SACFA (Standing Advisory Committee on Radio Frequency Allocation) Clearance

  • Step 3: Signing of the GOPA (Grant of Permission Agreement)

  • Step 4: Applying for the (WOL) Wireless Operating License to the Wireless Planning & Coordination Wing (WPC)

Let us now take a look at the genesis of the CRS Online Application Form

Earlier on, the CRS applicants had to fill in a physical form, more recently, the Ministry of I& B, GOI, has decided that an online application form may be easier to fill as well as monitor and fast track the process of application. Hence, the new online form has been designed to facilitate a self explanatory, self contained application from that ensures faster delivery and access.

However, there are some important factors that need to be kept in mind before you begin filling in the online application from……..

http://www.cronlineindia.net/Procedure%20to%20fill%20the%20Application%20form.pdf

 

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