SC slams Centre for giving ‘Z’ security to Ambani and said ” A 5yr old a five-year-old would not have been raped if there was security in Delhi


PTI : New Delhi, Wed May 01 2013, 2
Supreme Court

Centre‘s decision to provide ‘Z’ category security to the richest Indian Mukesh Ambani today drew flak from the Supreme Court which asked why such persons are given security cover by the government when the common man is feeling unsafe.

The apex court ticked off the government for giving protection to such persons when the common man in the country is unsafe because of lack of security and said a five-year-old girl would not have been raped if there was proper security in the capital.

The bench reasoned that the rich can afford to hire private security personnel.

“We read in newspapers that Ministry of Home has directed providing for CISF security to an individual. Why is state providing security to such person,” a bench headed by Justice G S Singhvi said without taking the name of Ambani.

“If there is threat perception then he must engage private security personnel,” the bench said adding, “Private businessmen getting security is prevalent in Punjab but that culture has gone to Mumbai.”

The bench, however, said: “We are not concerned about the security of X,Y,Z persons but about the security of common man.”

The bench was hearing a petition filed by a Uttar Pradesh resident on misuse security cover and red beacon provided by the government to people.

Government’s decision to provide ‘Z’ category security for Ambani had evoked sharp criticism from Left parties following which it was clarified that he will foot the expenses for this estimated to be Rs.15-16 lakh per month.

The business tycoon is the new entrant to the ‘Z’ category VIP security club after the Union Home Ministry had recently approved an armed commando squad following threat perceptions.

– See more at: http://www.indianexpress.com/news/supreme-court-slams-centre-for-giving-z-category-security-to-mukesh-ambani/1110186/#sthash.unMnK9Gz.dpuf

 

Now Ambanis want a personal police chowky in ugly ‘ Antilia” #WTFnews


Mumbai police mulling over proposal to set up chowki at Mukesh Ambani‘s house

ambani_policechownki

The above POSTER is by Rahul yogi deveshwar

Saturday, Apr 13, 2013, 18:53 IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: PTI

Mumbai police is mulling over a proposal sent by the office of RIL Chairman Mukesh Ambani to set up a police chowki at his sprawling residential building ‘Antilia‘ in Altamount Road here.

The proposal comes in the wake of a letter purportedly by terrorist outfit Indian Mujahideen in February this year threatening to harm Ambani and damage his residence Antilia for “supporting Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi and investing heavily in that state”.

“We have received a letter from the office of Mukesh Ambani and are thinking over it. However, there would be few formalities to be complied with and we are mulling over the issue,” said Deputy Commissioner of Police, Zone II Nisar Tamboli.

The police would also have to seek permission from the civic body to set up a police chowki at the 27-storeyed building in South Mumbai. If enough FSI is not available, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation would have to give additional FSI for this purpose, sources said.

Police have already approached the BMC for permission to set up the chowki. Sources in the Civic body confirmed that the police chief had written a letter to them seeking approval for the station at Antilia.

According to police, the proposed chowki would be for the entire area encompassing Altamount Road and not just Ambani’s residence. Police bandobast has already been provided at that place but there is no room to house the policemen.

During rains, policemen have no roof where they can seek shelter and also they have to go to nearby areas to go use a washroom. These difficulties would be overcome with the setting up of the chowki, sources said.

Following the threat letter received by Ambani’s office, police security in and around Antilia has been tightened. The letter was not on IM letter head and was also not signed by any IM office bearer. Crime branch probe is still on to find out who had sent the letter.

There’s no escape from the corporations that run India


Arundhati Roy, in Guardian

Domestic mega-corporations’ tentacles extend into every aspect of Indian life – but no one dares speak out against them

Mukesh Ambani, India’s richest man, is personally worth $20bn. He holds a majority controlling share in Reliance Industries Limited (RIL), a company with a market capitalisation of $47bn and global business interests that include petrochemicals, oil, natural gas, polyester fibre, special economic zones, fresh food retail, high schools, life sciences research and stem cell storage services. RIL recently bought 95% shares in Infotel, a TV consortium that controls 27 TV news and entertainment channels in almost every regional language. Infotel owns the only nationwide license for 4G broadband. Ambani also owns a cricket team.

RIL is one of a handful of corporations that run India. Some of the others are the Tatas, Jindals, Vedanta, Mittals, Infosys, Essar and the other Reliance (Adag), owned by Mukesh’s brother Anil. Their race for growth has spilled across Europe, central Asia, Africa and Latin America. Their nets are cast wide; they are visible and invisible, overground as well as underground. The Tatas, for example, run more than 100 companies in 80 countries. They are one of India’s oldest and largest private sector power companies. They own mines, gas fields, steel plants, telephone, cable TV and broadband networks, and run whole townships. They manufacture cars and trucks, own the Taj hotel chain, Jaguar, Land Rover, Daewoo, Tetley Tea, a publishing company, a chain of bookstores, a major brand of iodised salt and the cosmetics giant Lakme. Their advertising tagline could easily be “you can’t live without us”.

The era of the privatisation of everything has made the Indian economy one of the fastest growing in the world. However, like any good old-fashioned colony, one of its main exports is its minerals. India’s new mega-corporations are those who have managed to muscle their way to the head of the spigot that is spewing money extracted from deep inside the earth. It’s a dream come true for businessmen – to be able to sell what they don’t have to buy.

Of late, the main mining conglomerates have embraced the arts – film, art installations and the rush of literary festivals that have replaced the 1990s obsession with beauty contests. Vedanta, currently mining the heart out of the homelands of the ancient Dongria Kond tribe for bauxite, is sponsoring a “Creating Happiness” film competition for young film students who they have commissioned to make films on sustainable development. Vedanta’s tagline is “Mining Happiness”.

The Jindal Group brings out a contemporary art magazine and supports some of India’s major artists (who naturally work with stainless steel). Essar was the principal sponsor of the Tehelka Newsweek Think Fest that promised “high-octane debates” by the foremost thinkers from around the world, which included major writers, activists and even the architect Frank Gehry.

Tata Steel and Rio Tinto (which has a sordid track record of its own) were among the chief sponsors of the Jaipur literary festival. . Many of the world’s best and brightest writers gathered to discuss love, literature, politics and Sufi poetry. Some tried to defend Salman Rushdie‘s right to free speech by reading from his proscribed book, The Satanic Verses. In every TV frame and newspaper photograph the logo of Tata Steel (and its tagline, “Values Stronger Than Steel”) loomed, a benign, benevolent host. The enemies of free speech were the supposedly murderous Muslim mobs, who, the festival organisers told us, could have even harmed the schoolchildren gathered there.

Yes, the hardline Darul-uloom Deoband Islamic seminary did protest at Rushdie being invited to the festival. Yes, some Islamists did gather at the festival venue to protest and yes, outrageously, the state government did nothing to protect the venue. The battle for free speech against Islamist fundamentalism made it to the world’s newspapers. It is important that it did. But there were hardly any reports about Tata, the festival sponsors’ role in the war in the forests of central India – a war ostensibly waged against Maoists, but actually against all those who are resisting displacement by corporations such as Tata.

There were no reports either about the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act and the Chhattisgarh Special Public Security Act, which make even thinking an anti-government thought an offence. Or about the mandatory public hearing for the Tata Steel plant in Lohandiguda which local people complained actually took place hundreds of miles away in Jagdalpur, with a hired audience of 50 people, under armed guard. Where was free speech then?

No one mentioned Kalinganagar where, in 2006, police fired on those who protested against the construction of a boundary wall by Tata Steel. No one mentioned that journalists, academics and film-makers working on subjects unpopular with the Indian government – like the surreptitious part it played in the genocide of Tamils in the war in Sri Lanka, or the recently discovered unmarked graves in Kashmir – were being denied visas or deported straight from the airport.

But which of us sinners was going to cast the first stone? Not me, who lives off royalties from corporate publishing houses. We all watch Tata Sky, we surf the net with Tata Photon, we ride in Tata taxis, we stay in Tata hotels, sip our Tata tea in Tata bone china and stir it with teaspoons made of Tata steel. We buy Tata books in Tata bookshops. Hum Tata ka namak khatey hain. We’re under siege.

But which of us sinners was going to cast the first stone? Not me, who lives off royalties from corporate publishing houses. We all watch Tata Sky, we surf the net with Tata Photon, we ride in Tata taxis, we stay in Tata hotels, sip our Tata tea in Tata bone china and stir it with teaspoons made of Tata steel. We buy Tata books in Tata bookshops. Hum Tata ka namak khatey hain. We’re under siege.

If the sledgehammer of moral purity is to be the criteria for stone-throwing, then the only people who qualify are those who have been silenced already. Those who live outside the system; the outlaws in the forests or those whose protests are never covered by the press, or the well-behaved dispossessed, who go from tribunal to tribunal, bearing witness, giving testimony.

But the Litfest gave us our aha! moment. Oprah came. She said she loved India, that she would come again and again. It made us proud.

Read original article- Capitalism: A Ghost Story

Archives

Kractivism-Gonaimate Videos

Protest to Arrest

Faking Democracy- Free Irom Sharmila Now

Faking Democracy- Repression Anti- Nuke activists

JAPA- MUSICAL ACTIVISM

Kamayaninumerouno – Youtube Channel

UID-UNIQUE ?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6,229 other followers

Top Rated

Blog Stats

  • 1,836,241 hits

Archives

February 2021
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
%d bloggers like this: