Delhi Govt Insults Shaheed Ashfaqullah Khan by Naming Fish Market After Him #WTFnews


It is a matter of national shame that the insensitive authorities of
the Delhi Government have so recklessly renamed the fish market at
Ghazipur as Shaheed Ashfaqullah Khan Fish Market supposedly to honour
the memory of this great son of India and famed Urdu poet.

To set this right, we have created petition to the Chief Minister of Delhi and
requested her to rectify this horrendous faux pas ASAP.

This matter not only relates to the Urdu-speaking populace, freedom fighters
and concerned citizens, it is a  transgression on the sanctity of the
Indian nation which was formed from the blood and toil of such freedom
fighters and martyrs as Shaheed Ashfaqullah Khan.

The petition states that if  Delhi Government has run out  of
ideas to constructively and judiciously commemorate our martyrs,  poets
and intellectuals, it should at least refrain from making a  mockery of
their sacrifices and dedication to the cause of the nation.

Below is text of petition and do sign at

http://petitions.halabol.com/2013/02/18/case-shaheed-ashfaqullah-khan

Ms Sheila Dikshit
Chief Minister of Delhi
New Secretariat
IP Estate
New Delhi-110002

Dear Chief Minister,

On the behest of Anjuman  Taraqqi Urdu ( Hind)   I would like to bring to your notice an intriguing issue thatcan only be considered a matter of national shame as it not only shows an Urdu poet, and by corollary the entire Urdu community, in poor light but also runs the risk of provoking the ire of freedom fighters.

I am sure many concerned citizens like me would not like that the erstwhile
Murga Machli Market of the the Jama Masjid area (shifted to Ghazipur
area) should be named Shaheed Ashfaqullah Khan Fish Market. The fact
that it is located right in front of the Murga market is double jeopardy
which even a student of class V will testify. This supposedly to honour
the memory of a great son of India and an eminent poet of Urdu, the
national language! There cannot be a more apt example of myopic policies
and bad taste. It is even more surprising as this atrocity has been
committed under the auspices of an urbanized chief minister such as you
who claims to be a Dilliwali! To drive home my point let me quote a few
lines on the sights and sounds of Delhi, with reference to this market,
described in one of Delhi’s premier magazines Time Out:

‘If you are up for a more pungent olfactory sensation, dive into
Shaheed Ashfaqulla Khan Fish Market, created in 1999 in the sahdow (sic)
of a landfill as a replacement for the famously filthy Jama Masjid fish
bazaar. Around 4am daily, the trucks roll in with catfish and crabs in
water tanks, lobsters, tuna, mackerel, kingfish, prawns and hilsa on
ice.(Time Out on August 31 2012 9.51am, Time Out website, emphasis
added).

Do we want to pay homage to our national heroes with glowing
commemorations or shower them in a deluge of crabs, lobsters, tuna and
prawns? Is this the legacy we want to bequeath to our young generation?
This is surely nothing but a disservice to the memory of this brave
freedom fighter and martyr for the cause of the nation and also to Urdu
which has been a victim of linguistic genocide by the State in free
India.

Shaheed Ashfaqullah Khan should only be remembered as an Indian who was
an Urdu shayar par excellence, a brave freedom fighter and a martyr who
gave up his life for his country at the young age of 27. Therefore, it
will be a great service to his memory, if you rectified this grave faux
pas and reconsidered honouring his martyrdom in a more appropriate
manner befitting his stature.

I will be grateful if you could put right this bungle as soon as
possible and an acknowledgement of this note will be greatly
appreciated.

Sincerely,

 

Tulika offers books for children in Braille #DISABILITY


Books in Braille

Some of Tulika’s books are available in Braille. They have been adapted by Third Eye and are available through their website www.third-eye.org. You can find out more about the books listed below through the book search option on our website.

Bengali Titleswww.third-eye.org

Mukand and Riaz
The King and the Kiang
Who Will Rule?
Putul and the Dolphins
A Silly Story of Bondapalli
Brahma‘s Butterfly
The Snow King’s Daughter
Hanuman’s Ramayan
Vyasa‘s Mahabharata
Pavo Cavo
Pintoo and Giant

English Titleswww.third-eye.org

Mukand and Riaz
The King and the Kiang
Who Will Rule?
Putul and the Dolphins
A Silly Story of Bondapalli
Brahma’s Butterfly
The Snow King’s Daughter
Hanuman’s Ramayan
Vyasa’s Mahabharata
Pavo Cavo
Pintoo and Giant

Hindi Titles   www.third-eye.org

Mukand and Riaz
The King and the Kiang
Who Will Rule?
Putul and the Dolphins
A Silly Story of Bondapalli
Brahma’s Butterfly
The Snow King’s Daughter
Hanuman’s Ramayan
Vyasa’s Mahabharata
Pavo Cavo
Pintoo and Gian

_VISIT THEIR WEBSITE HERE

The feminist poets of Mumbra


Mohammed Wajihuddin, TNN | Mar 4, 2012,

In a modest flat off a dusty lane in the Muslim-majority town of Mumbra, a group of young girls is sitting in a semi-circle. Before they entered the apartment, they were all covered with the black veil, the unofficial dress code of any conservative Muslim mohalla in the subcontinent. But now, faces kissed by the sunlight, they await their turn at something equally liberating: poetry.

The young poets, initiated into the art two years ago, are gearing up to celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8 with yet another poetry recitation session. Emotions-some raw, others mature beyond their tender years-flow as the girls’ words become banners of dissent. Their poems protest the many inequalities that women face-female foeticide, financial dependence on men, unrequited love and the curses of divorce and widowhood.

The group came into being after Iranian-American poet Roxy Azari conducted a two-month-long poetry workshop for the young women in 2010. Azari, then on a Watson Fellowship, toured seven countries to engage young Muslim women and train them to express themselves through poetry. Her first stop was the 27-year-old Mumbai-based advocacy group Awaz-e-Niswan.

“Three days a week, Roxy would visit Awaz-e-Niswan’s Rahnuma Library at Mumbra and discuss socio-political issues with us. Then she would ask us to pen our feelings,” recalls Saba Khan who coordinated the poetry workshop. Both Awaz-e-Niswan and Rehnuma Library basically counsel and educate women on their rights, and the poetry sessions held now are an adjunct of the same philosophy-a desire to be free from the oppression of men.

Azari, famous for her slam poetry performances, left after the workshop for other destinations and better things, but she definitely ignited the dormant poet in a dozen or so young women. Each member of the group penned several poems, which are now part of a collection appropriately and evocatively titled Bebaak Qalam (Frank Pen). Three of them-Neha Ansari, Rabia Siddiqui and Faiza Shaikh-collaborated on an imaginative poem titled Agar Main Mard Hoti (If I were A Man) which portrays the many things men take for granted. For instance: “Agar main mard hoti/Subah der tak soti/Raat ghar der se aati (If I were a man/I would sleep late into the morning/ Come home late at night). And the poem perhaps expresses a collective feeling when it declares: “If I were a man/I would change the attitude of all men).”

Siddiqui, who studies at SNDT Women’s College, Juhu, says that before she joined the workshop she never realised her poetic talent. “I would occasionally read Ghalib and Faiz, but the workshop emboldened me not just to write poems but even continue my education,” says Siddiqui, who adds that her brother did not want her to study beyond Std 12, but her husband is “quite supportive”. “I am restless if I don’t write for a few days. I feel good after I have penned a few lines,” she says.

Evidently, poetry-writing provides a catharsis to these girls who otherwise have limited avenues to vent their suppressed feelings. They may not take out morchas in the streets but their poems hold aloft banners of protest. Fauzia Qureishi, by far the most accomplished in this young, bubbly group, has many poems to her credit, but the one about zindan (prison) and azm (ambition) clearly shines through the collection. The long poem talks about almost everything that a girl from a conservative Indian Muslim family has to face-early marriage, the threat of triple talaq, the gruelling work at home and the restrictions put in her path. “It is not just my story alone, but my protest on behalf of all the women who are suppressed and oppressed in a male-dominated society,” says the bespectacled Qureishi, quoting a couplet: “Kab tak kisi ki milkiyat main maani jaaon/Ek mard ki pehchan se kyon jaani jaaon (For how long am I going to be considered a property/Why should I be identified with the identity of a man?).

Mumbra may seem like an unlikely centre for feminist poetry but these young women are taking it there.

Its easier to censor Theatre


Vidya Rao, Thumri Artist

HYDERABAD: A guided tour of Unnava Laxmi Narayana’s ‘Malapalli’ and a taste of cynicism through Rachakonda Viswanatha Sastry’s ‘Aaru Saara Kathalu’ (Six stories on arrack) marked the second day of the national seminar on law and literature in the city. Socialism and class struggle as captured in literary works and machinations to censor art depicting real-life situations formed the essence of the discourse.
The issue of censorship on literature and play-acting brought different perspectives. Noted Gujarati playwright and activist Saroop Dhruv observed that it is easier to censor theatre than movies. “Staging a play requires the script to be submitted in advance. This is something films don’t go through. The experience is similar to having a foetus aborted before it takes shape,” said Saroop whose plays were targeted for critiquing contemporary issues, from communalism to displacement of slum-dwellers in the name of urban beautification in ‘Suno Nadi Kya Kehti Hai’.
Wielding censorship on women musicians by centres of power — a largely male dominated area — was brought out by publisher and Thumri artist, Vidya Rao.
The struggle of workers, marginalised classes and agricultural laborers in Andhra pradesh were covered in separate sessions by writer and filmmaker Kutumba Rao and Sudhakar’s paper on Ra Vi Sastry’s portrayal of the rot in judicial system. The censorship on ‘Malapali’ in pre-independent India was discussed in detail by Kutumba Rao whose recitation of Sri Sri’s rebel cry in ‘Maro Prapancham’ brought alive the struggle of the worker.
In the contemporary context, the legalese employed courts was portrayed in an anecdotal evidence by Suneetha Rani, professor at University of Hyderabad. The Tollywood movie ‘Leader’ which borrows from the dynasty politics in the state was presented through a paper by Sam Gundimeda which drew parallels between the case fought by K.G Kannabiran and Balagopal against the killings in Karamchedu and the cinematic portrayal of a warped sense of extra-judicial justice.

Indian Express

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