#India – Vedanta to revive lanjigarh by import from Indonesia, Tanzania, and Australia


Jayajit Dash  |  Bhubaneswar  June 19, 2013 ,BS

vedanta

 

Imports to revive Vedanta‘s Lanjigarh refinery

 After exhausting its options to source bauxite from the domestic market, Vedanta Aluminium Ltd (VAL) is mulling importing the raw material to resume operations at its Lanjigarh refinery.
The one-million alumina refinery has remained shut since December 5, 2012, on bauxite crunch and VAL has been making frantic efforts to restart the plant. The company recently announced it would resume operations of the refinery by the end of this month.

“We are looking at the possibility of importing bauxite as it will enable us to restart operations of the refinery quickly. VAL is exploring the possibility of imports from countries like Indonesia, Tanzania, and Australia. We hope to work out a deal in the next four-five days,” said a senior company official.

Although imported bauxite will be costlier for VAL, the firm is considering the option for the time being amid a hostile regulatory environment that has led to the suspension of many bauxite mines and also a lack of firm commitment from private miners on supplies.

#Indonesia Supreme court judge says Women enjoy being raped #WTFnews #Vaw


Thursday 17 Jan 2013 8:53 am World, metro.co.uk
Muhammad Daming Sunusi (
Muhammad Daming Sunusi (Picture: YouTube)
Jakarta, Jan 17,2013

A budding supreme court judge has ignited public outrage by saying women enjoy being raped.

Muhammad Daming Sunusi made the quip during a vetting session for Indonesia’s highest court.

When asked his views on the death penalty for rapists, he replied: ‘The rapist and the victim of rape both enjoy it, so we must think carefully before imposing the death penalty.’

According to reports the parliamentary selection panel laughed at his comments, but drew immediate criticism on social media and from rights groups.

Mr Daming later apologised for the remark, which he said was ‘intended to break the ice’.

Speaking at a press conference he declared: ‘I apologise to the Indonesian public from the bottom of my heart. I realise those words shouldn’t have come out from anyone, let alone a justice hopeful.’

Despite the apology two political parties have already said they would vote against Mr Daming being elected as one of 23 judges at the court in Jakarta.

Women’s rights groups have also suggested the chief judge of Palembang high court be censured.

 

Asian countries act to get cheap drugs #rightohealth


SouthViews

No. 37, 22 October 2012
SOUTHVIEWS is a service of the South Centre to provide opinions and analysis of topical issues from a South perspective.
Visit the South Centre’s website: www.southcentre.org.

Staring with Malaysia in 2003, many Asian countries are now taking actions to promote cheaper medicines through compulsory licensing, with Indonesia being the latest case
………………………………………………………………

By Martin Khor

By Martin Khor
Recent government actions by Indonesia and India to issue compulsory licenses are extending the trend in Asia to increase access to cheaper medicines to treat serious ailments, especially HIV/AIDS, cancer and hepatitis B.

The supply of generic medicines, either through import or local production, has been the major method of reducing prices and making the drugs affordable to more people.

When the required medicines are patented, which usually results in high prices,   governments are allowed by the WTO rules to issue a compulsory license to enable themselves or private companies to import or produce generic versions, which usually cost much less.

In 2003, Malaysia became the first developing country to issue a compulsory license to a local firm to import drugs to treat HIV-AIDS from India.  The cheaper generic drugs enabled the government to treat many more patients within the same budget.

Following this, Indonesia in 2004 issued a Presidential decree enabling the production of a some HIV-AIDS drugs while Thailand in 2007 issued compulsory licenses for several HIV-AIDS and cancer drugs.

In March this year, India approved its first compulsory license enabling a local company to produce a generic version of an anti-cancer drug, which could reduce the price of treating kidney and liver cancer from US$5,200 a month (the price of the branded product) to $160 a month (the price of the generic product).

The latest measure was taken on 3 September by Indonesian President Dr. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono who issued a decree which has the effect of a compulsory license.  It enables local manufacturers to make, import and sell generic versions of seven patented drugs used for treating HIV-AIDS and hepatitis B.

The decree said that in line with the urgent need to control HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B in Indonesia, “it is necessary to continue and expand the access policies to provide access to antiviral and anti-retroviral medicines still protected by patent.”

This is the third time Indonesia has issued a set of compulsory licenses. The latest decree stated that the 2004 and 2007 decrees were no longer sufficient to implement the policies.

The compulsory license is aimed at significantly reducing the prices of these life-saving medicines and making them accessible to thousands more Indonesian patients.

“We will ensure the availability of good-quality, safe and effective generic versions of anti-retroviral and anti-viral drugs,” said HM Subuh, infectious disease control director at the Indonesian Health Ministry, as quoted in the Jakarta Post of 19 October.

According to the decree, the generic companies would have to pay a royalty of 0.5% of the net sales value of the generic drugs to the companies that own the patents, such as Merck, Glaxo SmithKline, Bristol Myers Squibb, Abbott and Gilead.

The first decree in 2004 enabled cheaper generic medicines that provided HIV-infected patients with first-line anti-retroviral therapy.  However, these have become ineffective or less effective because of increasing resistance or the lower safety of the drugs.

The latest decree enables the supply of generic anti-retroviral products for not only better first but also second-line anti-retroviral therapy.

“With the 2012 regulation, we obviously can improve access to quality but affordable drugs,” Maura Linda Sitanggang, the Health Ministry’s Director General for Pharmaceuticals and Medical Equipment, told The Jakarta Post. “We’re using this mechanism concerning public interest on the production of quality but affordable medicines to treat HIV and HBV.”

The seven medicines which are the subject of the compulsory license (known in this case as for “government use”) are efavirenz, abacavir, didanosin, lopinavir + ritonavir combination, tenofovir, tenofovir + emtricitabine, and tenofovir + emtricitabine + efavirenz.

All the drugs are used to treat HIV-AIDS.  The drug tenofovir (brand name Viread produced by patent holder Gilead) is also used to treat hepatitis B, which affects 13 million people in Indonesia.  It had been approved in the United States for treating HIV-AIDS in 2001 and for treating chronic Hepatitis B in 2008.

The combination drug tenofovir + emtrisitabin (brand name Truvada, produced by Abbot) is taken in a single dose once a day.  It has been used to treat HIV-AIDS and in July 2012 it also became the first drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use as a preventive measure, to reduce the risk of HIV infection to people at high risk of infection including those who may engage in sex with HIV infected patients.

The Indonesian decree was the second compulsory license in Asia this year.

In India, the Patent Office in March approved the country’s first compulsory license to a local firm Natco Pharma to make a generic version of the cancer drug sorofenib tosylate (brand name Nexavar, produced by Bayer).

It was argued that at the high price of 2.8 lakh rupees (US$5,200) for a month’s dosage of Nexavar, only 200 patients were treated in India in a year.  Natco said that 8,000 people would need the drug, and it could supply a generic version at 8,800 rupees (US$160) for a month’s treatment.

The drug is used to treat advanced kidney and liver cancer.  According to the terms of the license, Natco would pay Bayer royalties of 6% of its net sales.

Bayer challenged the compulsory license and on 16 September the Intellectual Property Appellate Board rejected its petition, ruling that “If a stay is granted it will jeopardise the interests of the public who are in need of the drug.”

Other developing regions have also been making use of the compulsory license option in the WTO’s intellectual property treaty known as TRIPS.  They include Brazil and Ecuador in Latin America and Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe in Africa.

In 2001, the WTO’s Ministerial Conference in Doha adopted a TRIPS and Public Health Declaration that asserted that the TRIPS Agreement does not and should not prevent Members from taking measures to protect public health.

It affirmed that the Agreement should be interpreted in a manner supportive of the right to health and access to medicines for all.

The Declaration clarified:  “In this connection, we reaffirm the right of WTO Members to use, to the full, the provisions in the TRIPS Agreement, which provide flexibility for this purpose.”

Table: Active Substance Name, Name of Patent Holder, Patent Number, and Duration of Patents for Antiviral and Antiretroviral Medicines
 

NO. NAME OF ACTIVE SUBSTANCES NAME OF PATENT
HOLDERS
PATENT NUMBER DURATION OF
PATENT
1. Efavirenz Merck & Co., INC ID 0005812 Until the end of patent period,
August 7, 2013
2. Abacavir Glaxo Group
Limited
ID 0011367 Until the end of
patent period, May 14, 2018
3. Didanosin Bristol – Myers
Squibb Company
ID 0010163 Until the end of
patent period, August 6, 2018
4. Combination Lopinavir and
Ritonavir
Abbott
Laboratories
ID 0023461 Until the end of
patent period, August 23, 2018
5. Tenofovir Gilead Sciences,
Inc.
ID 0007658 Until the end of
patent period, July
23, 2018
6. Combination Tenofovir and
EmtrisitabinCombination Tenofovir, Emtrisitabin and Evafirenz
Gilead Sciences, Inc. ID P0029476 Until the end of
patent period, 3
November 2024

 

Sexuality and freedom of speech #censorship


M. Najibur Rohman, Semarang | Thu, 05/10/2012 , The Jakarta Post

The involuntary dissolution of Irshad Manji’s book launch in Salihara Cultural Center last week is representation of the tyranny of conservative groups that suppresses freedom of speech.

Indeed, as Muslim liberal activist Manji who wrote a book titled Allah, Liberty and Love, has been known as pro-contra a thinker as well as a lesbian. It seems Manji’s sexual identity was the primary motive for the protesters to deny her speech regardless of the essence of the discussion.

In this case, first of all, we have to make a difference between the private and public domain. Sexual orientation as well as faith or religion is a private domain. Everyone has this right and of course the state bears the responsibility for protection of the right.

Second, a discussion forum is an academic area that should remain free from “moral judgment”. Here, the most important thing is brains, not muscle.

The disparity between the notions deserves a wide space for anyone without considering sexual orientation. There is no reason for certain groups — including hard-line religious activists — to disperse or ban an academic forum by use of threat or derision.

The threat targeting Manji’s book discussion should prompt the state, in this case the National Police, to provide protection and security. It is clear that such discussion, characterized by academic and open-ended dialogue, is not intended to generate social anxiety.

Nevertheless, the police, citing the absence of permit and potential for disruption — based on the law — dispersed the discussion and therefore hurt freedom of speech.

Sexuality has long invited many thinkers and scholars to start discussions and debates. For certain members of the Indonesian public, especially those in the Muslim majority, homosexuality is seen as a violation of norms and rules of the religion.

The tale of Prophet Luth suggests homosexuality is a prohibited sexual orientation. But such conclusion, although in the mainstream, is just one of many exegesis of the Koran.

On the other hand, the discourse of sexuality actually is a part of social, political and ideological construction. Sex is related with history-knowledge-language and all of them are directed to body control.

Therefore, in a democracy like Indonesia there should be no discriminatory treatment for people based on their sexual orientation. Heterosexual and homosexual have the same position to exercise freedom of speech. Equality, a primary principle of the law, must be interpreted as the state’s way to protect human rights and guarantee their implementation.

In addition, violence is the chief nemesis of true democracy. It is time for the state to resist any kinds of acts that discredit the minorities and set up “religious oligarchy”. Here, dialogue is the best way to express an opinion. Disagreement is justified but must not be translated in the use of violence.

The writer teaches at Walisongo State Islamic Institute, Semarang.

UN appeals to India to ratify global nuclear test ban treaty


Ban Ki-moon

Image via Wikipedia

7TH FEB, 2012

United Nations: UN chief Ban Ki-moon has appealed to eight countries, including India, to ratify the CTBT to bring the global nuclear test ban into force.

The UN secretary general made the appeal after Indonesia became the 157th country to adopt the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).

Besides India, China, North Korea, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the US are the other nations in a core group of 44 nuclear countries which did not ratify the treaty.

The 44 nations which must ratify the CTBT to bring it into force all have nuclear weapons or atomic programmes.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon has appealed to eight countries, including India, to ratify the CTBT to bring the global nuclear test ban into force. AFP

This would accelerate the entry of CTBT into force, Ban said after his meeting with Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa at the UN headquarters.

During their meeting, Ban stressed the importance of Indonesia’s ratification of the CTBT given that the country is one of the so-called Annex 2 States, whose endorsement is required for the treaty to enter into force, a UN release said.

PTI

Archives

Kractivism-Gonaimate Videos

Protest to Arrest

Faking Democracy- Free Irom Sharmila Now

Faking Democracy- Repression Anti- Nuke activists

JAPA- MUSICAL ACTIVISM

Kamayaninumerouno – Youtube Channel

UID-UNIQUE ?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6,231 other followers

Top Rated

Blog Stats

  • 1,785,740 hits

Archives

June 2020
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
%d bloggers like this: