#RIP- Actor Jiah Khan found dead in Mumbai; police suspect suicide


PTI
Mumbai, June 04, 2013

Jiah Khan plays the second woman in Akshay’s life in the film.

25-year-old Bollywood actress Jiah Khan allegedly committed suicide on Monday night by hanging herself at her Juhu residence, police said. According to the police, her maid, watchman and neighbours are being interrogated to find out her last visitors.

Jiah’s mother and sister had gone out

and she was alone at the house when the incident happened, police said.

“Jiah’s mother and sister found her hanging when they returned at around 11 PM,” police said, adding that Jiah used her own dupatta to hang herself.

Police said postmortem of the body will be conducted today and they have registered a case of accidental death.

Police are yet to record the statement of the actress’ mother as she is in shock.

Jiah made her acting debut in Ram Gopal Varma‘s controversial movie, ‘Nishabd‘, where she acted opposite Amitabh Bachchan.

Upon its release in March 2007, the film received mixed reviews, but Jiah was noted for her confidence, attitude, and sex appeal.

She also got a Filmfare Best Debutant Nomination.

She then appeared alongside Aamir Khan in A R Murugadoss‘s ‘Ghajini’, the Hindi remake of the director’s own Tamil film of the same name.

Later she appeared as a supporting actress in Sajid Khan‘s multi starrer comedy film ‘Housefull’ (2010). This was her last film.

Jiah was brought up in England and had shifted to Mumbai recently to act in Hindi films.

Actor Dia Mirza reportedly broke the news of Jiah’s death on micro blogging site Twitter.

Police today questioned Suraj Pancholi, son of actor couple Aditya Pancholi and Zarina Wahab, to whom actress Jiah Khan had made her last phone call before ending her life.
25-year-old Jiah hanged herself at her Juhu residence between 11 PM and 11.30 PM yesterday, sending shock waves in Bollywood.

Jiah, according to police, last spoke to Suraj around 10:40 PM.

Suraj had gone to Juhu police station along with his actor parents and was being questioned, sources said.

According to Jiah’s mother Razia Khan, the actress, who made her dream debut opposite Amitabh Bachchan in ‘Nishabd’, was unhappy about her acting career. She had last appeared in a supporting role in Sajid Khan’s multi-starrer comedy ‘Housefull’ in 2010.

As per her mother, Jiah was exploring a career in interior designing besides acting in films.

Khan told the police that Jiah had gone to Hyderabad on June 2 for an audition which did not go well.

Her last rites have not yet been performed because the family is waiting for her friends and relatives to arrive from London, where she was born and brought up.

Police have also questioned her maid, watchman and neighbours to determine the cause of the alleged suicide.

The post-mortem examination at J J hospital suggested the death was caused due to hanging.

 

Mumbai Police warn of action against couples found at isolated places #WTFnews #moralpolicing #Vaw


MAHARASHTRA, Posted on Jan 24, 2013

Mumbai: Mumbai Police have warned of action against couples who meet at isolated places. According to police officials such couple face the risk of becoming the victim miscreants and rapists at isolated location.

According to the notice action will be taken against those couples who are found at isolated and secluded places. The Mumbai Police have sent the circular regarding the same to all police stations in the city.

Many couples, who are in love, are found sitting at isolated places along Mumbai’s beached. Such couples can be seen at Girgaum Chowpatty, Worli Sea Face, Marine Drive, Dadar Chowpatty, Bandra Band Stand, Juhu beach, Versova beach, Aksa beach, Madh Island, Gorai and Manori beach in Mumabi.

The police have taken this step after the brutal Delhi gangrape case of December 16, 2012.

 

 

Mumbai Children putting adults to shame in their eco friendly Diwali Drive #must share


Aarohi 11
Brihatej 12
Pulkit 11
Naman 12
Kshitij 12
Rahul 12
Ibaad 10
Esha 10

Aarohi  Chaudhuri,  11 years old , Mumbai, Nov 13

Last year ,me and my friends ,  the children of Maker Kundan Gardens and UTI Officers Quarters , in Juhu , celebrated a cracker free Diwali , as Crackers and Fireworks are the single largest cause of respiratory diseases like Bronchial Asthma, Chronic Bronchitis and other Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases. The other reasons are -

  • Levels of Air pollution, which are already high in India, reach astronomical levels on Diwali and can be very harmful to the human body.
  • Crackers release a lot of Ultra-violet and Infrared radiation, which are harmful to the eyes and the body parts.
  • Maximum numbers of Burn cases are reported during Diwali due to the improper use of crackers.
  • Humans might be able to protect themselves, but the crackers have a deep physical and mental impact upon animals.
  • Most of the factories manufacturing crackers employ children. So by bursting we are encouraging Child Labour.
  • Noise pollution due to the sound of these crackers is above the permitted levels. Crackers can cause deafness.We also started donation drive and raised Rs 5,000 which were given to NGOGoon, and this year we again continue .Last year, we were a small group of 6 dedicated children, Aarohi, Pulkit, Rahul, Kshitij, Pranesh, , Naman , Ibad, Esha , Brihataj , but now seeing our success we were joined by more children our numbers increased to 9 children. We are operating on a small scale, only in our locality, in Juhu Mumbai. The children are in age group of 9-13 years.The primary reason we started this was a newspaper article I read sometime in October 2011. It brought to light the death of a child due to being accidently hit on the head by one of those popular toy guns.

One thing that makes me grateful to my friends is the answer they gave their parents as to why they were part of this campaign. I expected something like “My friend told me it was a good idea.”, but definitely not, “I am doing this because I know what would have happened if I had been in place of that child who died due to a makeshift gun.” That truly left me elated.

We also run a Facebook page  called   Eco friendly diwali  which we started last year. We intend to donate what we collected to an acclaimed NGO named Goonj as we did last year.

Even though we collect donations for the downtrodden, the driving focus behind our campaign is to celebrate an eco friendly diwali.

Though many children in our neighborhood still burst crackers, we are not disheartened and are still working towards our goal.

We hope adults also join us , So let’s celebrate Diwali (Deepavali) as a festival of lights, not sound!

for further information contact me – aarohiac@gmail.com-022-26611308

 

The feminist poets of Mumbra


Mohammed Wajihuddin, TNN | Mar 4, 2012,

In a modest flat off a dusty lane in the Muslim-majority town of Mumbra, a group of young girls is sitting in a semi-circle. Before they entered the apartment, they were all covered with the black veil, the unofficial dress code of any conservative Muslim mohalla in the subcontinent. But now, faces kissed by the sunlight, they await their turn at something equally liberating: poetry.

The young poets, initiated into the art two years ago, are gearing up to celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8 with yet another poetry recitation session. Emotions-some raw, others mature beyond their tender years-flow as the girls’ words become banners of dissent. Their poems protest the many inequalities that women face-female foeticide, financial dependence on men, unrequited love and the curses of divorce and widowhood.

The group came into being after Iranian-American poet Roxy Azari conducted a two-month-long poetry workshop for the young women in 2010. Azari, then on a Watson Fellowship, toured seven countries to engage young Muslim women and train them to express themselves through poetry. Her first stop was the 27-year-old Mumbai-based advocacy group Awaz-e-Niswan.

“Three days a week, Roxy would visit Awaz-e-Niswan’s Rahnuma Library at Mumbra and discuss socio-political issues with us. Then she would ask us to pen our feelings,” recalls Saba Khan who coordinated the poetry workshop. Both Awaz-e-Niswan and Rehnuma Library basically counsel and educate women on their rights, and the poetry sessions held now are an adjunct of the same philosophy-a desire to be free from the oppression of men.

Azari, famous for her slam poetry performances, left after the workshop for other destinations and better things, but she definitely ignited the dormant poet in a dozen or so young women. Each member of the group penned several poems, which are now part of a collection appropriately and evocatively titled Bebaak Qalam (Frank Pen). Three of them-Neha Ansari, Rabia Siddiqui and Faiza Shaikh-collaborated on an imaginative poem titled Agar Main Mard Hoti (If I were A Man) which portrays the many things men take for granted. For instance: “Agar main mard hoti/Subah der tak soti/Raat ghar der se aati (If I were a man/I would sleep late into the morning/ Come home late at night). And the poem perhaps expresses a collective feeling when it declares: “If I were a man/I would change the attitude of all men).”

Siddiqui, who studies at SNDT Women’s College, Juhu, says that before she joined the workshop she never realised her poetic talent. “I would occasionally read Ghalib and Faiz, but the workshop emboldened me not just to write poems but even continue my education,” says Siddiqui, who adds that her brother did not want her to study beyond Std 12, but her husband is “quite supportive”. “I am restless if I don’t write for a few days. I feel good after I have penned a few lines,” she says.

Evidently, poetry-writing provides a catharsis to these girls who otherwise have limited avenues to vent their suppressed feelings. They may not take out morchas in the streets but their poems hold aloft banners of protest. Fauzia Qureishi, by far the most accomplished in this young, bubbly group, has many poems to her credit, but the one about zindan (prison) and azm (ambition) clearly shines through the collection. The long poem talks about almost everything that a girl from a conservative Indian Muslim family has to face-early marriage, the threat of triple talaq, the gruelling work at home and the restrictions put in her path. “It is not just my story alone, but my protest on behalf of all the women who are suppressed and oppressed in a male-dominated society,” says the bespectacled Qureishi, quoting a couplet: “Kab tak kisi ki milkiyat main maani jaaon/Ek mard ki pehchan se kyon jaani jaaon (For how long am I going to be considered a property/Why should I be identified with the identity of a man?).

Mumbra may seem like an unlikely centre for feminist poetry but these young women are taking it there.