#India – Woman ‘gang-raped’, brutally murdered in Indore #Vaw #WTFnews


 #India- Chastity, Virginity, Marriageability, and Rape Sentencing #Vaw  #Justice #mustread

Anuraag Singh, TNN Jun 1, 2013,

INDORE: Body of a woman, with brutal injuries, found near BCM Heights in Vijay Nagar locality has revived the shattering memories of 2012 Nirbhaya gangrape and killing of Delhi. The woman, aged in her 30s was sexually assaulted and the possibility of gangrape cannot be ruled out, said police officials.

The body was spotted by a security guard from a vacant plot at around 9 am. The head of the woman was reportedly smashed with a heavy object and a piece of pipe was stuffed into her privates. Police are trying to establish the identity of the victim, who appears to be a tribal by her attire and the fact that her left arm was tattooed with three names Chameli, Jawan Singh and Gulab.

The plot where the body of the woman was found was not the only place splashed with blood as blood stains were visible in the adjacent vacant plot, suggesting that the woman could well have been gang raped in the vacant plot and then dragged to the other plot where she was murdered.

“The post-mortem report of the woman has established major wounds on the head as the cause of death. The report also has clearly establishes sexual assault on the woman,” SP (Indore East) OP Tripathi told TOI.

Post-mortem conducted by a team of doctors, including a female doctor at the MY Hospital, will study the viscera and blood samples to arrive at a conclusion where the deceased was subjected to gangrape.”A case of murder and sexual assault is being registered at the Vijay Nagar police station and efforts are underway to establish the identity of the woman,” the SP-East said.The case has once again exposed the state of affairs around the posh BCM Heights apartments, which is just a walking distance from the Vijay Nagar police station. In April only, a sex racket was busted from one of the flats of BCM Heights building with the arrest of two call girls hailing from Kolkata, but the operator of the racket Ashok Chauhan and another key accused Fareida Sheikh are still on the run.

 

Shehla Masood Case- Saba’s counsel to file contempt case against jail staff


My Friend Shehla Masood

My Friend Shehla Masood

TNN | Jun 1, 2013, 

INDORE: A representative of Reliance Communication, Santosh Jadhav appreared before the special CBI court on Friday and got his statements recorded during the hearing on RTI activist Shehla Masood murder case on Friday. Two other witnesses namely, Anil Saini and Badre Aalam could not appear for family and personal reasons.Next hearing of case is schedule for July 3.

Defense counsel Mahendra Morya said that Santosh Jadhav gave details about six mobile numbers including a cell phone number related to main accused Zahida Pervez and Irfan.

Anil Kumar, counsel of Zahida Pervez, told media that she was innocent and was being falsely implicated. He alleged that CBI has trained witnesses about what to speak before presenting them before court.

Sunil Shrivastav, counsel of another accused and friend of Zahida, Saba Faoorqui said they are contemplating to file a case of contempt of court against jail authorities. He said Saba is suffering from some medical complication and her health is deteriorating. They had filed a petition in this regard with the court in March on which court had ordered to submit medical report in two weeks time, but jail authorities has yet not submitted the report.

Shehla Masood was killed in August 2011 in front of her house when she was about to leave for office in her car. Police arrested Zahida Pervez, Saba Farooqui, Saqib Danger, Irfan and Tabish in connection of the murder and all the accused are right now in jail in Indore as under trial.

 

Shehla Masood murder: Zaheda was insecure of Singh, claims witness #Vaw


May 31, 2013Indore: A prosecution witness in the RTI activist Shehla Masood murder case told the court in Indore on Friday that the main accused, Zaheda Parvez, had become ‘possessive’ about BJP MLA Dhruvnarayan Singh and resented Masood’s friendship with him.

Zaheda Parvez. PTI

Zaheda Parvez. PTI

Deposing before the special CBI court in Indore, Sanjay Gupta, a Bhopal-based industrialist and the BJP MLA’s friend, said that Zaheda always suspected the women who came in contact with Dhruvnarayan.

He further told the court that after the murder, Zaheda had a phone conversation with him. When he bemoaned Shehla’s death, she said, “One always pays for the bad deeds. As you sow, so shall you reap.”

According to the CBI, Zaheda had Shehla killed because she was jealous of the latter’s increasing closeness to the BJP MLA.

Shehla was shot dead outside her Bhopal residence on 16 August, 2011. Police have arrested five persons in the case including Zaheda Parvez.

Gupta also said that Dhruvnarayan had told him that Zaheda once had a fight with him when he had gone to Shehla’s residence.

According to Gupta, Dhruvnarayan had called him on 16 August, 2011 and gave him the news of murder.

Dhruvnarayan told him to pass on the message to Shehla’s father Sultan Masood that the MLA was at a temple and would go there later, Gupta said, adding that he passed on the message to Masood.

 

Maternal Health Activist Madhuri of JADS arrested #Vaw #Tribalrights


 

English: National Rural Health Mission of India

English: National Rural Health Mission of India (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Five Years of NRHM-JSY and more than a decade of RCH: continuing maternal deaths in Barwani and MP
Background
Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) was launched under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in
April 2005 as a safe motherhood intervention, with the specific objective of reducing maternal and
neo-natal mortality by relying on institutional delivery as the primary strategy for making available
medical care during pregnancy, delivery and post delivery period, and thus promoting safe
motherhood. All women are encouraged to avail institutional care during pregnancy and delivery,
and through ASHAs recruited specifically for this purpose institutional delivery is being promoted
among poor pregnant women. JSY is a 100 % centrally sponsored scheme, and it links cash
incentives to pregnant women with hospital delivery and post-delivery care. Reproductive and
Child Health (RCH-I) has been operational since 1997 as a project to provide a variety of
reproductive and child health services in rural areas to bring down maternal and infant mortality, in
order to reduce fertility rates and achieve population control. The second phase of the program
(RCH-II) also commenced in 2005. NRHM itself was launched with the promise to improve
availability and accessibility to health care services to the rural population, especially the
disadvantaged groups including women and children, by strengthening public health systems for
efficient service delivery, improving access, enabling community ownership and demand for
services, enhancing accountability and promoting decentralization.
It is against this context of programmes and interventions and associated fund flows from
the central government and several international agencies that one needs to view the status of
public health services, of maternal and child health in the country in general and specifically in the
high-focus states like MP, and the developments in Badwani that is the focus of this report.
Mass protest against maternal deaths in District Hospital, Barwani
On 28th December 2010 a rally was held in Barwani town, the headquarters of a predominantly
adivasi district in south-western MP. Nearly a thousand people gathered under the banner of
Jagrit Adivasi Dalit Sangathan (JADS), a mass organisation, to protest against extremely
negligent treatment of women in pregnancy and labour, particularly the death on 29th November
2010 of Vypari bai, an 8-months’ pregnant woman admitted in the District Hospital.
The people had come for this rally
from far-flung adivasi villages of the
district, and sought to draw attention to and
to protest against extreme callousness and
ill-treatment regularly meted out to women
in pregnancy and labour by the public
health system, particularly the District
Hospital (DH). A quick perusal of the DH
records indicated that between April-
November 2010 there had been 25 maternal
deaths, and 9 maternal deaths had been
recorded in this hospital in the month of
November 2010 alone. In addition, deaths
of 21 neonates (within 24 hours of birth) had been recorded, related to 511 deliveries conducted
in the hospital during November 2010. People complained that women with problems during
pregnancy and labour were frequently referred to Indore Medical College Hospital, located 150
kms away, despite the DH being supposed to deal with such cases.
The tragic story of Vypari bai – ‘institutional death’ instead of ‘institutional delivery’
Vypari bai, a 22 year old woman had travelled over 55 kms from her village Ban since the
morning of 27th November 2010 to reach the District Hospital, having been referred from the
PHC at Bokrata, and then from the CHC at Pati. She had been carried in a `jhuli’ (cloth sling)
over the first 10 kms from her village to Bokrata, from where the family managed to get the
Janani Express ambulance. She had experienced a convulsion that morning, and had high blood
pressure (BP) and eclampsia at the time of admission in the DH around 1.30 pm on 27th
November.
Following her examination by a gynaecologist at the time of admission in the DH on 27th
Nov., she was visited only once by another doctor during the entire day on 28th Nov. She had been
prescribed medicines after admission to control her BP, but her treatment sheets show only two
measurements of BP during the entire stay from 27th to 29th Nov. No attempt seems to have been
made to deliver the baby, by either induction or cesarean, as is the standard procedure in such
cases. An ultrasound scan on 28th November (for which the woman was taken by auto-rickshaw to
a private centre even though the hospital has this facility) showed the presence of live foetus.
Both the mother and mother-in-law of Vyparibai are trained health workers, presently
working as ASHAs in the NRHM. The mother-in-law Dunabai in desperation attempted to contact
the gynaecologist, who never turned up to see the patient in spite of repeated pleas from the
patient’s family. Moreover the doctor on duty, after checking the patient only once on 28th, was
also absent from the hospital premises. After repeated efforts to contact her, at late night at around
11 pm on 28th November, she instructed the nurse on duty that the relatives could take the patient to
Indore, but did not bother to examine the patient or modify the treatment. When the family went to
the doctor’s residence (which is within the hospital premise at a stone’s throw from the ward) on
28th night to ask her to attend to the woman as she was in great pain, the doctor refused to go,
saying she would phone the instructions to the nurse. The young woman finally breathed her last at
5 am on 29th November 2010, without medical attention despite being admitted in the District
Hospital.
Both the block CHC and Barwani DH are CEMONC (Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric
Neonatal Care) centres, and the DH is equipped with a Blood Bank. Such centres are supposed
to provide emergency services related to pregnancy/ delivery round the clock and 365 days a year.
In any case, a hospital at the level of district hospital is supposed to provide emergency services at
all times, whether or not it is a CEMONC. Further, there is provision that in case of complications,
CEMONC centers can contract-in services of private medical practitioners. So she could have been
referred under the ‘Janani Sahayogi Yojana’ to one of the two local private hospitals. The DH has
four gynaecologists and two anaesthetists, who could have ensured Vypari bai’s delivery. However,
the case paper shows that nearly 35 hours after admission, the patient had been referred to the
medical college hospital in Indore at around 11 PM on 28th. Further, the family was asked to sign
an undertaking, stating that they were refusing to take her to Indore and they took responsibility for
the consequences. It has been repeatedly experienced that, rather than using the institutional
provisions, patients are generally referred to Indore. And are also made to sign such undertakings.
Several other cases of denial of services leading to complications and ill-treatment at all
levels of health services have been documented by JADS. Few illustrative ones are described
below.
District Hospital, Barwani – Baltabai, 20 years, Village- Ubadagad, Pati Block,
On 6th June 2010, 9-months’ pregnant Baltabai was taken to Pati CHC with labour pains, by bus at around 12
o’clock in the afternoon. There was no doctor in the CHC. When the family contacted the BMO and
requested him to see Baltabai, the BMO did not do so, but simply arranged for the Janani Express
Ambulance and referred the patient to the District Hospital. Around 3 PM Baltabai was admitted in the
female ward of the DH. Not a single doctor was present in the female ward, ostensibly because `it was
Sunday’. The nurse on duty informed the doctor who was supposed to be on duty, but was not physically
present in the hospital premises, about the serious condition of Baltabai. She was advised some blood test,
and after the blood report was available, referred by the doctor to M.Y. Hospital, Indore. During this period
the relatives were not adequately informed about the condition of the patient and need for referral. What is
more serious is that the family was not informed about intrauterine foetal death. Following the nurse’s
advice to go to the local hospital instead of Indore, the family took Baltabai to the private trust hospital in
the Barwani town, where the doctor examined Baltabai and informed them that the foetus was dead. She
recommended an emergency operation to remove the dead foetus and save the mother. The family had no
option but to go ahead with this surgery. They incurred a cost of around Rs 10,000/- and an additional Rs.
7000/- were spent on medicine. The family, dependent on daily-wages, had to borrow money from local
money lenders at very high interest rate.
On 14th June Baltabai was discharged from the trust hospital. However, her agony was not
over yet. On reaching home that evening she complained of abdominal distension and pain. On 15th
June, at 4 am she was taken to a private practitioner, where she was cathetarised, and again referred
to the DH, where she was treated till 21st June. On 21st June Baltabai was referred to M. Y. Hospital
Indore for treatment of paraplegia. What exactly happened to Baltabai from15th – 21st June is not
very clear, largely because there are no trustworthy clinical records. Why and how Baltabai
developed paraplegia was never explained to the family members and other concerned people.
Fortunately Baltabai’s condition improved in the M.Y. Hospital and she was subsequently
discharged on 1st July. The ordeal of Baltabai lasted for 24 days (6th June to 30th June), and has left
the family severely indebted.
In September 2008 a woman in labour at the District Hospital was referred by the attending
doctor to Indore as a case of obstructed labour. The family took her to the local Trust hospital,
where a caesarean operation was performed and the child delivered safely. However, due to the
delay the child developed complications and had to be admitted in the neo-natal intensive care unit
(NICU) in the DH.
CHC-Pati block – Meera, Patel phaliya , Pati
Meera had symptoms of threatened abortion since the second month of pregnancy; and was treated
at CHC, Pati. However, the doctor advised her that she should not rely on the medicines available
in the hospital, and made the family purchase injections and medicines from outside the hospital,
worth about Rs 1000-1200. Meera followed all the instructions given by the doctor, as she was told
that she would have a difficult labour. Despite this treatment Meera had intrauterine bleeding one
morning. When she called up the CHC for the Janani Express ambulance she was told that since
she was from Pati itself, she should go to the hospital by herself, and would not be provided the
ambulance. The lady walked over 5-8 km, for almost 2 hours, bleeding and in terrible pain, to reach
the CHC. At the CHC, she was informed that the baby had died in the womb. The family was
forced to purchase few special medicines from outside for the operation to remove the dead foetus.
PHC Menimata – Baniya Bai
On the night of 11th November 2008 Baniya bai went to the PHC Menimata for delivery. The
compounder and nurse asked her family for Rs 100, which the family did not give. The next
morning she was forced to leave the hospital on grounds of being anaemic. Baniya Bai, in
labour pain, managed to crawl out to the road outside the PHC, where she delivered with the help
on the local dai. She was then sent by members of JADS to CHC Silawad by the Janani
ambulance.
These are not isolated cases; there are reports of similar incidents of maternal deaths and
denial of treatment at the health centres, including the DH in Barwani.
Demanding Accountability for Negligence
We were visiting Barwani to get a firsthand
account of the situation there
concerning health services, particularly
in the District hospital. On the morning
of 28th December when we tried to meet
the CMHO and the concerned lady duty
doctor (who happens to be the CMHO’s
daughter) we were told that they were
out of town. The gynaecologist who had
admitted Vypari bai on 27th November
said she had anemia and eclampsia and
was not in a condition to be operated
upon; and that they did not have a
ventilator in the hospital. This
gynaecologist was not around the day
after admission (28th November) to monitor the progress; she is usually out of the hospital four
days of the week performing sterilization operations in family planning camps.
We observed the rally taking place outside the DH on 28th December. About 500 people
(nearly half of them women) had gathered at the entrance of the DH at around 12 noon, by which
time the OPD was almost over. The 2-3 doctors present there left when they heard the rally
approaching. The police tried to snatch away from the rallyists their microphone and the cart on
which it was placed; however the rallyists managed to convince them that they would leave very
soon. About fifteen minutes later the people moved away from the hospital premises and
continued their dharna on the road in front of the Collectorate office, well away from the DH.
Several activists and ordinary village women, including the mother-in-law of the deceased
Vyaparibai spoke of their travails at the DH. A set of 22 issues concerning the District hospital,
which were mentioned in the memorandum of demands, were read out to the assembled people.
The Civil Surgeon was asked for, but he refused to come out to receive the petition; finally the
ADM came and just gave a brief assurance that the issues would be responded to in writing in 15
days time. By around 4 PM the rally had dispersed.
Response by the administration – ‘the message is secondary, crack down on the messenger’
We met the Collector on 28th December evening after the rally and apprised him of the state of
affairs in the DH. It emerged that the process of carrying out maternal death reviews had not
been carried out in case of any of the 25 maternal deaths. During our meeting with the Collector,
the CMHO and CS came when they were summoned. According to the CMHO such maternal
deaths keep occurring, that women here were very anaemic, and it was ‘not possible to bring
them down to zero’. When pointed out that the DH was a CEMONC centre, that there were 4
serving gynaecologists and 2 anaesthetists, and it was enquired why such institutional deaths
were still taking place, there was no satisfactory response. The Collector appreciated our
bringing things to his notice, and said he would initiate
the task of Maternal Death Reviews. At the same time,
he also hinted at linkages of the mass organisation with
‘Bastar’ and ‘Andhra Pradesh’, thereby seeking to
discredit the people’s organisation as being associated
with the ‘Naxalites’, who have been outlawed by the
central government.
We are now extremely shocked and dismayed
that two days after this rally (on 30th Dec.) as per local
press reports, the police has foisted several charges on
the leaders of JADS and 200 people who participated
in the protest. They have been charged with Sec 146 of
IPC (unlawful assembly, rioting, armed with deadly weapon which when used is likely to cause
death), Sec 186 IPC (obstructing public servant in discharge of public functions), and Sec 16(3)
of MP Kolahal Rules. On 31st December one of the activists of the organisation, Bachhiya bhai,
was arrested and sent to jail on charges that were slapped on him and others in 2008, when they
had protested against the denial of services in PHC Menimata (described above).
It needs to be mentioned that the pilot phase of community-based monitoring of rural
health services in MP under NRHM had been implemented in Barwani during 2007-08. Even
prior to this the mass organisation JADS had been actively addressing the health problems in the
area in several ways. In May 2008 a three-day programme of monitoring of services at the CHC
Pati and dialogue with health officials (with the intention to improve them), was followed up
with a rally at Barwani town on the dismal state of health services in the DH. So the area has a
history of peaceful rallying for improvement of rural health services. However, there seems to
have been hardly any concerted response from the administration to address the genuine
problems faced by and raised by the people.
Is the situation restricted to Badwani?
The situation regarding maternal deaths seems to be similar in many other districts of MP. The
audit report of NRHM in MP by the CAG gives an idea of the serious situation in the state.
According to the CAG audit report for the period 2005-06 to 2008-09 incidences of maternal and
infant deaths in MP remained high. In the 12 districts surveyed for the audit there had been 1377
maternal deaths in all in the four-year period – Betul recorded 152, Bhopal 269, Indore 162,
Shahdol recorded 393, Dhar recorded 125, Ujjain 124, and so on. Shahdol district reported 55
maternal deaths in 2008-09. The audit report also points out that despite increase in number of
institutional deliveries, post-delivery mortality remained alarmingly high. The Maternal Mortality
Rate remained high at 379 per lakh live births. Interestingly, the state government has fixed a
lower target than that of the central government for reduction of MMR and IMR. While NRHM
envisages MMR of less than 100 per lakh live births and IMR of 30 per 1000 live births by 2012,
the MP government has set these at less than 220 and 60 respectively. It has said that due to
shortage of manpower it was not possible to achieve the NRHM targets! The audit also found that
Maternal Death Review Committees were to be constituted at each district, but had not been done.
A large number of neo-natal deaths also seem to be occuring: according to figures (collected by
RCH – NRHM for monitoring and evaluation) between April-November 2010, there were 154 neonatal
deaths in the entire district of Badwani, of which 133 have been recorded at the District
Hospital (3879 deliveries recorded at the DH in the same period).
Some other findings of the CAG audit indicate that even after four years of NRHM the
state government was not taking adequate measures to address the long-standing problems of
lack of basic medical facilities, lack of physical infrastructure, and of doctors and other staff.
For instance: the number of health centres fell short of the prescribed norms; several centres,
particularly sub-centres were functioning without buildings; none of the institutions had been
upgraded to Indian Public Health Standards (IPHS); of the 82 CHCs designated as first referral
units (FRUs) 80 percent were non-functional and the rest were only partially functional. The
state government itself acknowledged that the health centres are non-functional due to shortage
of man-power. 101 out of 297 PHCs in the 12 districts studied were running without doctors,
despite the provision for hiring contractual staff under NRHM. Monitoring Committees too at
state and at lower levels to review the activities under NRHM had not been formed till 2009.
One also finds that several hundreds of crores of rupees have been spent over the past few
years under RCH-JSY. Government reports show that the allocations for RCH-JSY had increased
since 2005, and expenditure too had increased from Rs 26.29 crores in 2005-06 to Rs 344.87
crores in 2008-09. By 2009-10 Rs 797.65 crores from NRHM funds had been spent on activities
to improve maternal and child health.
Issues and Concerns
We wish to draw attention to the grave situation that seems to be building up in places like
Barwani. It is now more than a decade of RCH and five years since NRHM, RCH-II, JSY etc,
were launched as flagship programmes. On one hand, the government is spending several
hundreds of crores of rupees annually, is vigorously promoting institutional deliveries as a
panacea for high maternal and infant mortality, and talks of safe and guaranteed health services;
through processes such as community monitoring it is promoting the idea of demanding
accountability from the public health machinery. On the other hand, the ground reality in places
like Barwani shows little change. And when people get organized to demand accountability
through peaceful actions, attempts are made to discredit and ‘brand’ their leaders, to intimidate
and repress them, and to shield the responsible officials who seem to be to completely indifferent
to the plight of the patients.
One finds that in spite of several interventions and expenses of crores of rupees, women
continue to die in large numbers. Majority of these deaths are avoidable and completely
unacceptable. It is precisely these preventable deaths that JSY claims to address, right from
ante-natal care (ANC) to post-delivery care of mother and new-born, by getting the pregnant
women to register soon after pregnancy and `motivating’ them to go to a hospital for delivery.
However, the ground reality indicates that the government is not improving the `health’ of the
health facilities in order that they treat satisfactorily women in labour, especially those with
complications. This is corroborated by the findings of the audit of the performance of NRHM in
MP. The experiences of ill-treatment narrated by the rural women also point to the apathy of the
doctors and the poor quality of care they receive when they come in pain and suffering.
How many more such `institutional deaths’, complications and denial of services, are to
occur before the hospital doctors become responsible and accountable; before the state health
department, the health ministry, the rogi kalyan samitis, the district health societies, the
numerous managers, planners, consultants, and international agencies look beyond their
ritualistic exercises of working on technical assistance, planning, evaluating, re-evaluating, replanning,
merely recording numbers of pregnant women registered, of institutional deliveries and
of beneficiaries etc., in the name of safe motherhood and child health, and seriously take note of
the reality of the deaths of women and infants?
Dr Abhay Shukla – National Joint Convenor, Jan Swasthya Abhiyan
Dr Indira Chakravarthi – Public Health Researcher, Delhi
Rinchin – Bhopal
8.1.2011

 

 

Madhuri of JADS has been arrested for fighting against contnuing Maternal Deaths In Barwani #Vaw #Tribalrights


 

 

English: National Rural Health Mission of India

 

Five Years of NRHM-JSY and more than a decade of RCH: continuing maternal deaths in Barwani and MP

 
Background
Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) was launched under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in
April 2005 as a safe motherhood intervention, with the specific objective of reducing maternal and
neo-natal mortality by relying on institutional delivery as the primary strategy for making available
medical care during pregnancy, delivery and post delivery period, and thus promoting safe
motherhood. All women are encouraged to avail institutional care during pregnancy and delivery,
and through ASHAs recruited specifically for this purpose institutional delivery is being promoted
among poor pregnant women. JSY is a 100 % centrally sponsored scheme, and it links cash
incentives to pregnant women with hospital delivery and post-delivery care. Reproductive and
Child Health (RCH-I) has been operational since 1997 as a project to provide a variety of
reproductive and child health services in rural areas to bring down maternal and infant mortality, in
order to reduce fertility rates and achieve population control. The second phase of the program
(RCH-II) also commenced in 2005. NRHM itself was launched with the promise to improve
availability and accessibility to health care services to the rural population, especially the
disadvantaged groups including women and children, by strengthening public health systems for
efficient service delivery, improving access, enabling community ownership and demand for
services, enhancing accountability and promoting decentralization.
It is against this context of programmes and interventions and associated fund flows from
the central government and several international agencies that one needs to view the status of
public health services, of maternal and child health in the country in general and specifically in the
high-focus states like MP, and the developments in Badwani that is the focus of this report.
Mass protest against maternal deaths in District Hospital, Barwani
On 28th December 2010 a rally was held in Barwani town, the headquarters of a predominantly
adivasi district in south-western MP. Nearly a thousand people gathered under the banner of
Jagrit Adivasi Dalit Sangathan (JADS), a mass organisation, to protest against extremely
negligent treatment of women in pregnancy and labour, particularly the death on 29th November
2010 of Vypari bai, an 8-months’ pregnant woman admitted in the District Hospital.
The people had come for this rally
from far-flung adivasi villages of the
district, and sought to draw attention to and
to protest against extreme callousness and
ill-treatment regularly meted out to women
in pregnancy and labour by the public
health system, particularly the District
Hospital (DH). A quick perusal of the DH
records indicated that between April-
November 2010 there had been 25 maternal
deaths, and 9 maternal deaths had been
recorded in this hospital in the month of
November 2010 alone. In addition, deaths
of 21 neonates (within 24 hours of birth) had been recorded, related to 511 deliveries conducted
in the hospital during November 2010. People complained that women with problems during
pregnancy and labour were frequently referred to Indore Medical College Hospital, located 150
kms away, despite the DH being supposed to deal with such cases.
The tragic story of Vypari bai – ‘institutional death’ instead of ‘institutional delivery’
Vypari bai, a 22 year old woman had travelled over 55 kms from her village Ban since the
morning of 27th November 2010 to reach the District Hospital, having been referred from the
PHC at Bokrata, and then from the CHC at Pati. She had been carried in a `jhuli’ (cloth sling)
over the first 10 kms from her village to Bokrata, from where the family managed to get the
Janani Express ambulance. She had experienced a convulsion that morning, and had high blood
pressure (BP) and eclampsia at the time of admission in the DH around 1.30 pm on 27th
November.
Following her examination by a gynaecologist at the time of admission in the DH on 27th
Nov., she was visited only once by another doctor during the entire day on 28th Nov. She had been
prescribed medicines after admission to control her BP, but her treatment sheets show only two
measurements of BP during the entire stay from 27th to 29th Nov. No attempt seems to have been
made to deliver the baby, by either induction or cesarean, as is the standard procedure in such
cases. An ultrasound scan on 28th November (for which the woman was taken by auto-rickshaw to
a private centre even though the hospital has this facility) showed the presence of live foetus.
Both the mother and mother-in-law of Vyparibai are trained health workers, presently
working as ASHAs in the NRHM. The mother-in-law Dunabai in desperation attempted to contact
the gynaecologist, who never turned up to see the patient in spite of repeated pleas from the
patient’s family. Moreover the doctor on duty, after checking the patient only once on 28th, was
also absent from the hospital premises. After repeated efforts to contact her, at late night at around
11 pm on 28th November, she instructed the nurse on duty that the relatives could take the patient to
Indore, but did not bother to examine the patient or modify the treatment. When the family went to
the doctor’s residence (which is within the hospital premise at a stone’s throw from the ward) on
28th night to ask her to attend to the woman as she was in great pain, the doctor refused to go,
saying she would phone the instructions to the nurse. The young woman finally breathed her last at
5 am on 29th November 2010, without medical attention despite being admitted in the District
Hospital.
Both the block CHC and Barwani DH are CEMONC (Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric
& Neonatal Care) centres, and the DH is equipped with a Blood Bank. Such centres are supposed
to provide emergency services related to pregnancy/ delivery round the clock and 365 days a year.
In any case, a hospital at the level of district hospital is supposed to provide emergency services at
all times, whether or not it is a CEMONC. Further, there is provision that in case of complications,
CEMONC centers can contract-in services of private medical practitioners. So she could have been
referred under the ‘Janani Sahayogi Yojana’ to one of the two local private hospitals. The DH has
four gynaecologists and two anaesthetists, who could have ensured Vypari bai’s delivery. However,
the case paper shows that nearly 35 hours after admission, the patient had been referred to the
medical college hospital in Indore at around 11 PM on 28th. Further, the family was asked to sign
an undertaking, stating that they were refusing to take her to Indore and they took responsibility for
the consequences. It has been repeatedly experienced that, rather than using the institutional
provisions, patients are generally referred to Indore. And are also made to sign such undertakings.
Several other cases of denial of services leading to complications and ill-treatment at all
levels of health services have been documented by JADS. Few illustrative ones are described
below.
District Hospital, Barwani – Baltabai, 20 years, Village- Ubadagad, Pati Block,
On 6th June 2010, 9-months’ pregnant Baltabai was taken to Pati CHC with labour pains, by bus at around 12
o’clock in the afternoon. There was no doctor in the CHC. When the family contacted the BMO and
requested him to see Baltabai, the BMO did not do so, but simply arranged for the Janani Express
Ambulance and referred the patient to the District Hospital. Around 3 PM Baltabai was admitted in the
female ward of the DH. Not a single doctor was present in the female ward, ostensibly because `it was
Sunday’. The nurse on duty informed the doctor who was supposed to be on duty, but was not physically
present in the hospital premises, about the serious condition of Baltabai. She was advised some blood test,
and after the blood report was available, referred by the doctor to M.Y. Hospital, Indore. During this period
the relatives were not adequately informed about the condition of the patient and need for referral. What is
more serious is that the family was not informed about intrauterine foetal death. Following the nurse’s
advice to go to the local hospital instead of Indore, the family took Baltabai to the private trust hospital in
the Barwani town, where the doctor examined Baltabai and informed them that the foetus was dead. She
recommended an emergency operation to remove the dead foetus and save the mother. The family had no
option but to go ahead with this surgery. They incurred a cost of around Rs 10,000/- and an additional Rs.
7000/- were spent on medicine. The family, dependent on daily-wages, had to borrow money from local
money lenders at very high interest rate.
On 14th June Baltabai was discharged from the trust hospital. However, her agony was not
over yet. On reaching home that evening she complained of abdominal distension and pain. On 15th
June, at 4 am she was taken to a private practitioner, where she was cathetarised, and again referred
to the DH, where she was treated till 21st June. On 21st June Baltabai was referred to M. Y. Hospital
Indore for treatment of paraplegia. What exactly happened to Baltabai from15th – 21st June is not
very clear, largely because there are no trustworthy clinical records. Why and how Baltabai
developed paraplegia was never explained to the family members and other concerned people.
Fortunately Baltabai’s condition improved in the M.Y. Hospital and she was subsequently
discharged on 1st July. The ordeal of Baltabai lasted for 24 days (6th June to 30th June), and has left
the family severely indebted.
In September 2008 a woman in labour at the District Hospital was referred by the attending
doctor to Indore as a case of obstructed labour. The family took her to the local Trust hospital,
where a caesarean operation was performed and the child delivered safely. However, due to the
delay the child developed complications and had to be admitted in the neo-natal intensive care unit
(NICU) in the DH.
CHC-Pati block – Meera, Patel phaliya , Pati
Meera had symptoms of threatened abortion since the second month of pregnancy; and was treated
at CHC, Pati. However, the doctor advised her that she should not rely on the medicines available
in the hospital, and made the family purchase injections and medicines from outside the hospital,
worth about Rs 1000-1200. Meera followed all the instructions given by the doctor, as she was told
that she would have a difficult labour. Despite this treatment Meera had intrauterine bleeding one
morning. When she called up the CHC for the Janani Express ambulance she was told that since
she was from Pati itself, she should go to the hospital by herself, and would not be provided the
ambulance. The lady walked over 5-8 km, for almost 2 hours, bleeding and in terrible pain, to reach
the CHC. At the CHC, she was informed that the baby had died in the womb. The family was
forced to purchase few special medicines from outside for the operation to remove the dead foetus.
PHC Menimata – Baniya Bai
On the night of 11th November 2008 Baniya bai went to the PHC Menimata for delivery. The
compounder and nurse asked her family for Rs 100, which the family did not give. The next
morning she was forced to leave the hospital on grounds of being anaemic. Baniya Bai, in
labour pain, managed to crawl out to the road outside the PHC, where she delivered with the help
on the local dai. She was then sent by members of JADS to CHC Silawad by the Janani
ambulance.
These are not isolated cases; there are reports of similar incidents of maternal deaths and
denial of treatment at the health centres, including the DH in Barwani.

 
Demanding Accountability for Negligence
We were visiting Barwani to get a firsthand
account of the situation there
concerning health services, particularly
in the District hospital. On the morning
of 28th December when we tried to meet
the CMHO and the concerned lady duty
doctor (who happens to be the CMHO’s
daughter) we were told that they were
out of town. The gynaecologist who had
admitted Vypari bai on 27th November
said she had anemia and eclampsia and
was not in a condition to be operated
upon; and that they did not have a
ventilator in the hospital. This
gynaecologist was not around the day
after admission (28th November) to monitor the progress; she is usually out of the hospital four
days of the week performing sterilization operations in family planning camps.
We observed the rally taking place outside the DH on 28th December. About 500 people
(nearly half of them women) had gathered at the entrance of the DH at around 12 noon, by which
time the OPD was almost over. The 2-3 doctors present there left when they heard the rally
approaching. The police tried to snatch away from the rallyists their microphone and the cart on
which it was placed; however the rallyists managed to convince them that they would leave very
soon. About fifteen minutes later the people moved away from the hospital premises and
continued their dharna on the road in front of the Collectorate office, well away from the DH.
Several activists and ordinary village women, including the mother-in-law of the deceased
Vyaparibai spoke of their travails at the DH. A set of 22 issues concerning the District hospital,
which were mentioned in the memorandum of demands, were read out to the assembled people.
The Civil Surgeon was asked for, but he refused to come out to receive the petition; finally the
ADM came and just gave a brief assurance that the issues would be responded to in writing in 15
days time. By around 4 PM the rally had dispersed.
Response by the administration – ‘the message is secondary, crack down on the messenger’
We met the Collector on 28th December evening after the rally and apprised him of the state of
affairs in the DH. It emerged that the process of carrying out maternal death reviews had not
been carried out in case of any of the 25 maternal deaths. During our meeting with the Collector,
the CMHO and CS came when they were summoned. According to the CMHO such maternal
deaths keep occurring, that women here were very anaemic, and it was ‘not possible to bring
them down to zero’. When pointed out that the DH was a CEMONC centre, that there were 4
serving gynaecologists and 2 anaesthetists, and it was enquired why such institutional deaths
were still taking place, there was no satisfactory response. The Collector appreciated our
bringing things to his notice, and said he would initiate
the task of Maternal Death Reviews. At the same time,
he also hinted at linkages of the mass organisation with
‘Bastar’ and ‘Andhra Pradesh’, thereby seeking to
discredit the people’s organisation as being associated
with the ‘Naxalites’, who have been outlawed by the
central government.

 
We are now extremely shocked and dismayed
that two days after this rally (on 30th Dec.) as per local
press reports, the police has foisted several charges on
the leaders of JADS and 200 people who participated
in the protest. They have been charged with Sec 146 of
IPC (unlawful assembly, rioting, armed with deadly weapon which when used is likely to cause
death), Sec 186 IPC (obstructing public servant in discharge of public functions), and Sec 16(3)
of MP Kolahal Rules. On 31st December one of the activists of the organisation, Bachhiya bhai,
was arrested and sent to jail on charges that were slapped on him and others in 2008, when they
had protested against the denial of services in PHC Menimata (described above).
It needs to be mentioned that the pilot phase of community-based monitoring of rural
health services in MP under NRHM had been implemented in Barwani during 2007-08. Even
prior to this the mass organisation JADS had been actively addressing the health problems in the
area in several ways. In May 2008 a three-day programme of monitoring of services at the CHC
Pati and dialogue with health officials (with the intention to improve them), was followed up
with a rally at Barwani town on the dismal state of health services in the DH. So the area has a
history of peaceful rallying for improvement of rural health services. However, there seems to
have been hardly any concerted response from the administration to address the genuine
problems faced by and raised by the people.
Is the situation restricted to Badwani?
The situation regarding maternal deaths seems to be similar in many other districts of MP. The
audit report of NRHM in MP by the CAG gives an idea of the serious situation in the state.
According to the CAG audit report for the period 2005-06 to 2008-09 incidences of maternal and
infant deaths in MP remained high. In the 12 districts surveyed for the audit there had been 1377
maternal deaths in all in the four-year period – Betul recorded 152, Bhopal 269, Indore 162,
Shahdol recorded 393, Dhar recorded 125, Ujjain 124, and so on. Shahdol district reported 55
maternal deaths in 2008-09. The audit report also points out that despite increase in number of
institutional deliveries, post-delivery mortality remained alarmingly high. The Maternal Mortality
Rate remained high at 379 per lakh live births. Interestingly, the state government has fixed a
lower target than that of the central government for reduction of MMR and IMR. While NRHM
envisages MMR of less than 100 per lakh live births and IMR of 30 per 1000 live births by 2012,
the MP government has set these at less than 220 and 60 respectively. It has said that due to
shortage of manpower it was not possible to achieve the NRHM targets! The audit also found that
Maternal Death Review Committees were to be constituted at each district, but had not been done.
A large number of neo-natal deaths also seem to be occuring: according to figures (collected by
RCH – NRHM for monitoring and evaluation) between April-November 2010, there were 154 neonatal
deaths in the entire district of Badwani, of which 133 have been recorded at the District
Hospital (3879 deliveries recorded at the DH in the same period).
Some other findings of the CAG audit indicate that even after four years of NRHM the
state government was not taking adequate measures to address the long-standing problems of
lack of basic medical facilities, lack of physical infrastructure, and of doctors and other staff.
For instance: the number of health centres fell short of the prescribed norms; several centres,
particularly sub-centres were functioning without buildings; none of the institutions had been
upgraded to Indian Public Health Standards (IPHS); of the 82 CHCs designated as first referral
units (FRUs) 80 percent were non-functional and the rest were only partially functional. The
state government itself acknowledged that the health centres are non-functional due to shortage
of man-power. 101 out of 297 PHCs in the 12 districts studied were running without doctors,
despite the provision for hiring contractual staff under NRHM. Monitoring Committees too at
state and at lower levels to review the activities under NRHM had not been formed till 2009.
One also finds that several hundreds of crores of rupees have been spent over the past few
years under RCH-JSY. Government reports show that the allocations for RCH-JSY had increased
since 2005, and expenditure too had increased from Rs 26.29 crores in 2005-06 to Rs 344.87
crores in 2008-09. By 2009-10 Rs 797.65 crores from NRHM funds had been spent on activities
to improve maternal and child health.
Issues and Concerns
We wish to draw attention to the grave situation that seems to be building up in places like
Barwani. It is now more than a decade of RCH and five years since NRHM, RCH-II, JSY etc,
were launched as flagship programmes. On one hand, the government is spending several
hundreds of crores of rupees annually, is vigorously promoting institutional deliveries as a
panacea for high maternal and infant mortality, and talks of safe and guaranteed health services;
through processes such as community monitoring it is promoting the idea of demanding
accountability from the public health machinery. On the other hand, the ground reality in places
like Barwani shows little change. And when people get organized to demand accountability
through peaceful actions, attempts are made to discredit and ‘brand’ their leaders, to intimidate
and repress them, and to shield the responsible officials who seem to be to completely indifferent
to the plight of the patients.
One finds that in spite of several interventions and expenses of crores of rupees, women
continue to die in large numbers. Majority of these deaths are avoidable and completely
unacceptable. It is precisely these preventable deaths that JSY claims to address, right from
ante-natal care (ANC) to post-delivery care of mother and new-born, by getting the pregnant
women to register soon after pregnancy and `motivating’ them to go to a hospital for delivery.
However, the ground reality indicates that the government is not improving the `health’ of the
health facilities in order that they treat satisfactorily women in labour, especially those with
complications. This is corroborated by the findings of the audit of the performance of NRHM in
MP. The experiences of ill-treatment narrated by the rural women also point to the apathy of the
doctors and the poor quality of care they receive when they come in pain and suffering.
How many more such `institutional deaths’, complications and denial of services, are to
occur before the hospital doctors become responsible and accountable; before the state health
department, the health ministry, the rogi kalyan samitis, the district health societies, the
numerous managers, planners, consultants, and international agencies look beyond their
ritualistic exercises of working on technical assistance, planning, evaluating, re-evaluating, replanning,
merely recording numbers of pregnant women registered, of institutional deliveries and
of beneficiaries etc., in the name of safe motherhood and child health, and seriously take note of
the reality of the deaths of women and infants?
Dr Abhay Shukla – National Joint Convenor, Jan Swasthya Abhiyan
Dr Indira Chakravarthi – Public Health Researcher, Delhi
Rinchin – Bhopal
8.1.2011

 

 

 

 

 

Asghar Ali Engineer: Simple, fearless, straight from the heart


May 14, 2013

Renowned Islamic scholar Asghar Ali Engineer, who passed away in MumbaiImages ] on Tuesday , was opposed to all forms of religious bigotry including by the clergy of his own faith. For opposing the Syedna, spiritual of Dawoodi Bohras, Engineer faced scorn, boycott and even, sometimes, violence. In February 2000 Dilip D’souza had chronicled in Rediff.com one such assault on Asghar Ali Engineer; we reproduce it here. In Tribute.

If you want to find Asghar Ali Engineer on a working day, you’ll have to make your way to his office in Santa Cruz, Bombay. To get there, you edge through the chaos outside the railway station: buses and rickshaws bear down on you, hawkers of everything conceivable are everywhere, the occasional cow meanders about. Past them, the grubby building has a too-low entrance on which I’ve rammed my forehead more times than I can count. That negotiated, you walk up the narrow stairs to a small office, overflowing with books, papers, newspapers and magazines.

Invariably in a white or beige kurta and pajama, Asghar Ali sits in a room at the back. It’s a near-sure bet he’s busy pecking intently at a keyboard. Earlier, that keyboard belonged to a small red typewriter; lately it is part of a laptop. He writes with energy and passion people half his age can’t match, turning out articles and pamphlets and books on a wide range of subjects. He’ll be the first to acknowledge that it’s not high literature he’s producing in that room. But he writes like he talks to you: simply, fearlessly and straight from the heart. Never a hint of hedging or obfuscation.

That is why this man is so widely respected. That is why, too, he is so hated. Hated enough, that at Bombay airport on February 13, three goons beat up this 60-year-old heart patient. Hated enough, that pals of those goons have since gone into a kind of accusatory overdrive, making public statements that it was actually Engineer who was doing the beating and abusing.

To anyone who knows Asghar Ali even slightly, the idea of him assaulting someone is so absurd, it might have been funny. But it is not funny in the least.

To understand what happened at the airport that day, you have to know that Engineer is a Dawoodi Bohra. This is a Muslim sect of traders, originally from Gujarat. Their spiritual head is the 85-year-old Dr Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin (now 102) known simply as The Syedna. The Syedna maintains strict control over his flock via a system of seven taxes and multiple regulations, all enforced by his priests.

For many years, Asghar Ali has campaigned for reform within the Bohra community, asked over and over again for an accounting from the Syedna for the money he collects through those taxes. As reformers usually are, he is unpopular among the clergy, among the faithful. They have attacked him four times already, going back to 1977.

February 13 saw the fifth attack. That day, Asghar Ali was on an Alliance Air (a subsidiary of Indian Airlines) flight from Bhopal to Bombay, via Indore. It was supposed to be a half-hour halt at Indore, just enough to drop off and pick up passengers. But an hour passed and still the plane stayed put on the ground. Turned out the Syedna himself was to board the flight there, and the great man was delayed.

Nearly 3,000 of the Syedna’s followers had gathered to wave tearful goodbyes to him at Indore. Seeing this crowd, the airport Indian Airlines personnel ‘felt it could be risky to let the airplane take off without [the Syedna].’ So they delayed the departure, hoping ‘to prevent a law and order problem.’ (Quotes from The Times of India [ Images ], February 17).

Apparently several of the passengers on the flight objected to this delay, and Asghar Ali Engineer joined the protest. Of course, the protest had no effect. But when the Syedna finally arrived and the flight took off, Engineer told Outlook, two of his followers, ‘after consulting the Syedna, began abusing … [T]hey said, “You shaitan, get down and see what happens to you.” ‘

What happened to the ‘shaitan’ was that in the terminal at Bombay, three men assaulted him. One was one of the Syedna’s fellow flyers, the other two were from among the hordes who had turned up to fondly greet him on arrival. The assault continued for several minutes. Asghar Ali fell to the ground, bleeding. Eventually the police rescued him and took him to Nanavati hospital.

Meanwhile, more of the Syedna’s followers paid visits to Asghar Ali’s home and that crowded first-floor office in Santa Cruz. These were not courtesy calls to express concern for his health. No, they ransacked both places, up to the fans on the ceiling. As Asghar Ali wrote to me some days later: “My household things have been destroyed completely. Office computers were also destroyed.”

The story does not end there. The Syedna’s followers have wasted very little time cranking up the propaganda machine. They took a delegation to the chief minister to demand protection for the Syedna from Engineer. (There was one extremely interesting feature of this delegation that I will get to in a bit). Then they flooded the newspapers with letters recounting what they say really happened on that Indore-Bombay flight.

The assaulter, the propaganda would have it, was Engineer. First, he had stood at the entrance with his arms outspread, preventing the Syedna from entering. After waiting “quietly” for some minutes on the ladder, the Syedna managed to make his way into the plane. That’s when Asghar Ali began “abusing” him in “foul language”, “provoking” him and his 20 followers throughout the flight to Bombay. The delegation said that Asghar Ali’s language was “unbearable and intolerable to any follower of the religion.” To top it all, Asghar Ali actually mounted a “physical assault” on the Syedna.

“The fact remains”, one letter said, “that it was Engineer who took the law in his hands first and whatever happened afterwards was a result of that.” Another expressed these lucid opinions: “Engineer [doesn't] even know how to behave with a person of [the Syedna's] dignity and class. Engineer is … a curse on society. … May [the Syedna's] enemies burn in the fires of hell.”

Florid accusations aside, who ransacked Asghar Ali’s home and office? The Syedna’s nephew, Badrul Jamali Bhai, used strangely familiar language at a press conference: “Someone whose feelings may have been hurt could have done it.” More familiar language came from a Syedna spokesman: “It was the natural feelings of his followers that broke out into violence. If someone abuses our father, how can we tolerate it?”

Ah yes, that language of intolerance again. Feelings were hurt, some things just can’t be tolerated, the assault was only an expression of those “natural feelings.” I didn’t catch it in the reports I found, but I am confident someone among the Syedna’s men used that word loved by goons intent on lying propaganda, whether during Nazi Germany’s [ Images ] Kristallnacht or after the demolition of the Babri Masjid [ Images ].

“Spontaneous.”

As in: the attacks on Jews that November 9 night in 1938 were, said Joseph Goebbels, a “spontaneous” demonstration by the German people against the murder of a German embassy official in Paris. As in: leaders of the Shiv Sena [ Images ] admitted that their “boys” were out rioting in Bombay in 1992-93, but that they appeared “spontaneously” to “prevent the massacre of Hindus.” As in: the destruction of the Babri Masjid, leaders of the BJP told us, was a “spontaneous” reaction of Hindus whose “feelings had been hurt” enough.

Yes indeed, when it is bigotry, when it is intolerance of differing opinions, there are no religious boundaries. The defenders of the Syedna could be the defenders of German purity could be the defenders of Hinduism.

Apart from his calls for reform among the Bohras, Asghar Ali Engineer is a strong and learned spokesman for religious sanity. In particular, his was a prominent voice after the demolition of that mosque and the 1992-93 Bombay riots. His team of volunteers fanned out to speak to riot victims all over the city. The report he issued based on their findings (Bombay’s Shame) is a sad and damning commentary on the destruction the so-called defenders of Hinduism brought on the heads of all Bombay, Hindus and otherwise. His subsequent writings have kept up that commentary. They have brought him hatred from the defenders of Hinduism just as severe as he gets from the Syedna’s flock.

And that’s why the Syedna’s delegation that went to the chief minister was so interesting. It was led by two prominent Bombay politicians: Maharashtra’s [ Images ] ex-Minister for Housing Raj Purohit and Khetwadi MLA Atul Shah.

Both belong to the BJP.

Dilip D’Souza

Image: Asghar Ali Engineer passed away on Tuesday  | Photograph: Wikimedia Commons

 

Shehla Masood murder case: CBI court summons two witnesses


TNN | May 14, 2013,

INDORE: Special CBI court in Indore has on Monday issued summons to two witnesses, including Sanjay Gupta, industrialist friend of Bharatiya Janata Party MLA from Bhopal South, Dhruvnarayan Singh and an official of Reliance Communication Deepak Yadav, in connection with the RTI activist Shehla Masood murder case.
Sanjay Gupta and Deepak Yadav were supposed to appear in court on Monday as witnesses of CBI, but they failed to appear before Special CBI court of Anupam Shirvastav. Miffed at their absence, the court issued summons to both asking them to appear on next hearing on May 30 and 31. Also, the court has asked CBI to present its list of witnesses during the next hearing. On earlier two occasions too, CBI’s witness had failed to appear in court.Defence counsel, Sunil Shrivastav, alleged that CBI is delaying the case. “In last one year, only 11 witnesses’ have been produced in the court out of 150 listed in the charge-sheet. In this way, it would take 15 years to complete the hearing and till then accused will be behind the bar,” said Shrivastav.

Shehla Masood was killed in August 2011 in front of her house when she was about to leave for office in her car.

Police arrested Zahida Parvez, Saba Farooqui, Saqib Danger, Irfan and Tabish in connection of the murder and all the accused are right now in jail in Indore as under trial.

 

Indore woman professor terminated for lodging Sexual Harrassment complaint #Vaw #WTFnews


TNN | May 10, 2013, 03.18 AM IST

INDORE: The complainant of alleged sexual harassment reported in the Indian Institute of Management, Indore (IIM-I) has been terminated from the post. The decision was taken after the report was tabled by the gender sensitivity committee recently.

Sources said, the woman professor was terminated on the grounds of administrative action. However, various people have raised fingers over the quick termination of the faculty member. “The woman was terminated without being served any notice or charge-sheet. How can a complainant in such a serious case sacked?” quipped a source.

On the other hand, the institute authorities, like in the past, are tightlipped over the issue. The institute has not revealed the finding of the newly established gender sensitivity committee. IIM-I, director, N Ravichandran refused to comment on the issue. “No comments,” he said.

The lady professor of the marketing department had lodged a complaint in February last week with the gender sensitivity committee. She had also expressed her mistrust on the committee to the IIM-I board chairman K V Kamath. Later, a fresh committee was constituted, which had tabled its report recently.

 

Fake #Aadhaar card scam busted in Surat #UID


 

TNN | Mar 17, 2013,
SURAT: Police busted a fake Aadhar card form collection unit in Mahidharpura area on Saturday. Four persons were arrested for making fake Aadhar cards and cheating people of around Rs 45,000.
Out of the four accused, two are employees of an official Aadhar card-making contract agency and were using officially provided equipments to cheat people.
Police arrested Naresh Patel, Shahid Aamdani, Tushar Narol and Salim Shaikh for allegedly running the form collection centre and collecting money from victims. They collected Rs 300 per form from the victims. Interestingly, government charges no fees for Aadhar card.
Around 150 filled up forms were recovered from the centre and police believe that the accused collected Rs 45,000 from the victims.
They claimed that they are the official agency to collect data for Aadhar card and issued form. Of the arrested accused, Patel and Aamdani are employees of an Aadhar card contract agency based in Ahmedabad but are residents of Surat. Both were posted at Indore and Ujjain. After finishing their work, the accused did not return the company’s laptop and came directly to Surat. They used the laptops for cheating people. Patel and Aamdani, both resident of Surat planned the racket in association with Narol and Shaikh.
Police seized two laptops, two biometric finger print scanner, eye scanner and two web cameras. The accused were running the network in Gurukrupa apartment in Khansaheb Dela of Mahidharpura.
Patel and Narol are resident of Katargam area of the city while Aamdani is resident of Lalgate and Shaikh is resident of Rampura area of the city.
The scam came to light following a complaint by a citizen Prassanjeet Jaray, who was told that the government does not charge any fees for Aadhar cards.

 

#India – Drunk Man wakes up sterilized in a Madhya Pradesh hospital #WTFNEWS


By, TNN | Mar 17, 2013,

Bring 500 for sterilisation, take home a Nano

 Pic- Bring 500 for sterilisation, take home a Nano

JABALPUR: When Rajkumar Ahirwar accepted an offer on March 13 to go to the neighborhood adda (local pub) from Deepak Rajak, a casual acquaintance, he had little idea what awaited him. The 22-year-old from Ashok Nagar woke up from his drunken stupor in a government district hospital the next day with a certificate in his pocket that said he had been vasectomised

In a bid to achieve sterilisation targets, touts are running riot in parts of Madhya Pradesh even as government functionaries are being induced to get more people for these operations. The promises range from a Nanocar for arranging 500 such patients, a fridge for 50 and a 10 gm goldcoin for 25.

“Complaints have been pouring in of people being forced to undergo vasectomies and tubectomies,” a source in the health department said. “These incidents show the hollowness of chief minister Shivraj Singh Chauhan‘s assurance in February last year that he would ensure such practices aren’t encouraged.”

Alarmingly, many of those being given the “treatment” include the unmarried and the mentally challenged. Sources said some of them were even in their 70s. There have also been complaints of lower level officers intimidating the poor to sign up for the procedure by threatening to cancel their BPL cards and other facilities.

The prime victims, quite predictably, are the hapless tribals ignorant of their rights and poor dalits too feeble to fend off the pressure. A senior government doctor in Mandla alleged that Baiga tribals were sterilized in Dindori and Shahdol district hospitals recently but the issue was hushed up. In January, three women died in a sterilization camp held in Vidisha. Here, too, no responsibility was fixed. A substantial chunk of people queuing up at sterilization camps are from the tribal belts of Barwani, Khargone, Alirajpur and Jhabua. “It is shocking that in many cases the patients aren’t given discharge cards after the operation,” says Madhuri, a member of Jagrit Adivasi Dalit Sangathan (JADS), an NGO. This means that in case of any medical complications the health department cannot be held accountable.

Doctors, too, seem to have turned into butchers with many busy notching up the numbers. According to standard norms, a surgeon is expected to do 30-50 operations a day, but in

Indore and Malwa regions doctors are openly boasting of 500 daily surgeries. However, Dr Ranjana Gupta, joint director, MP Health Services, dismissed reports of underhand dealings or forced sterilisations and insisted that the instances were vastly exaggerated.

But hospitals are clearly on an overdrive to beat the March 31 deadline to reach their targets. “That’s why the bizarre incentives like car and gold coin,” said a doctor who refused to come on record. JADS has already filed a PIL on maternal health with the Indore bench of the high court where the issue of sterilisations and the callous approach of health functionaries have been highlighted.