Gujarat tops in India with 149 swine flu deaths in 2013


 

swine

Smitha R l Ahmedabad, March 26,2013, DNA
There is a reason why swine flu statistics are being treated as state secret. Gujarat has recorded the highest number of swine flu deaths in the country in 2013 and has the second highest number of cases as well. The state had 808 swine flu cases and 149 deaths due to the disease up to March 23, 2013. This means 18% of the cases resulted in death whereas Delhi, which recorded the highest number of swine flu cases at 1454, had a death rate of mere 1.1%. The national capital recorded just 16 deaths in 2013.
This dubious distinction could explain why the Gujarat government is clamping down on information and statistics about swine flu cases. It should be noted that the last update on swine flu from the health department was on March 19, at which point the number of deaths due to the disease was 125 while the total cases reported where 701. In the four days since then, the state has recorded a whopping 107 cases and 24 deaths.
Earlier, health minister Nitin Patel when contacted by DNA had gone on record to state that that the government was not releasing the data because it was to have a debate on the issue in the assembly on Monday as demanded by a member of the Opposition.
However, Congress MLA Chandrika Baria who was to move the private member’s bill in the assembly on the matter, was not present on Monday and hence it was not discussed. 
“As the member was not present, we did not discuss the matter. We will talk tomorrow on the matter,” was all that Patel was willing to say about the data. It should be noted that Patel had earlier said that the government would release the swine flu data from Monday onwards.
Interestingly, principal secretary, health services, PK Taneja; additional director of health Dr Paresh Dave; and nodal officer for swine flu Dr Dinkar Raval did not take calls from DNA. A message to them on the matter also did not elicit any reply.
Earlier, the state government’s handling of swine flu had come in for sharp criticism by the Gujarat high court. In its report filed before the court on March 21, the health department had merely stated that only 6.2% of the total cases of swine flu in the country were reported from Gujarat, and that it was less than other states. Unimpressed by the data, an annoyed high court had then directed the state to file a detailed report on swine flu.
In contrast, Delhi had 1,454 cases but only 16 deaths during the same period

 

Nine-year-old visually challenged girl raped in Delhi #disability #Vaw #Shame


Published: Tuesday, Dec 4, 2012, 19:06 IST
Place: New Delhi | Agency: IANS

A nine-year-old visually challenged girl was raped by her former neighbour in Delhi, police said Tuesday, adding that the attacker has been arrested.

The girl was alone at her home at the time of the attack. She reported the incident to her mother, a domestic help, when she came back to home. The girl’s name has been withheld for legal reasons.

Her attacker, identified as Karan Nepali, 23, raped her at her residence in central Delhi’s Desh Bandhu Gupta Road area on Monday night and fled from the spot.

“A case regarding the incident was registered Monday night and the accused was arrested from his residence in Sarai Rohilla in the early hours on Tuesday,” said Additional Commissioner of Police Devesh Chandra Srivastava.

Nepali lived in the neighbourhood of the girl, but for the past few months he has been residing in Sarai Rohilla area.

HIV and the Law-Risks, Rights & Health


Thursday, 25 October 2012, IFHHRO

Earlier this year, the Global Commission on HIV and the Law published a report presenting the available evidence on human rights and legal issues relating to HIV: HIV and the Law: Risks, Rights & Health.

The Global Commission on HIV and the Law consisted of fourteen individuals who advocate on issues of HIV, public health, law and development. Some of the Commission’s findings include:

  • 123 countries have legislation to outlaw discrimination based on HIV, and 112 legally protect at least some populations based on their vulnerability to HIV. However, these laws are often ignored or badly enforced.
  • In over 60 countries it is a crime to expose another person to HIV or to transmit it, especially through sex. At least 600 individuals living with HIV in 24 countries have been convicted under HIV-specific or general criminal laws.
  • In many countries, the law dehumanises many of those at highest risk for HIV: sex workers, transgender people, men who have sex with men (MSM), people who use drugs, prisoners and migrants. Rather than providing protection, the law renders these “key populations” all the more vulnerable to HIV. The criminalisation of sex work, drug use and harm reduction measures create climates in which civilian and police violence is rife and legal redress for victims impossible.
  • 78 countries make same-sex activity a criminal offence, with penalties ranging from whipping to execution.
  • A growing body of international trade law and the over-reach of intellectual property (IP) protections are impeding the production and distribution of low-cost generic drugs. IP protection is supposed to provide an incentive for innovation but experience has shown that the current laws are failing to promote innovation that serves the medical needs of the poor. The fallout from these regulations—in particular the TRIPS framework—has exposed the central role of excessive IP protections in exacerbating the lack of access to HIV treatment and other essential medicines.

Reason for hope

Notwithstanding these problems, the Commission has found reason for hope: “There are instances where legal and justice systems have played constructive roles in responding to HIV, by respecting, protecting and fulfi lling human rights. To some such an approach may seem a paradox—the AIDS paradox. But compelling evidence shows that it is the way to reduce the toll of HIV.” Examples given are police cooperation with community workers who assist sex workers; the promotion of harm reduction programmes for injecting drug users; effective legal aid for people living with HIV; and court actions and legislative initiatives promoting the rights of sexual minorities, women and young people. Despite international pressures to prioritise trade over public health, some governments
and civil society groups are using the law to ensure access to affordable medicines, while exploring new incentives for medical research and development.

The report is available in English, Spanish,French and Russian.

Download HIV and the Law: Risks, Rights & Health

 

A village where every house has a cancer patient


Feb 13, 2012-A village in Germany has left health experts baffled as almost every household there has a resident suffering from cancer, a media report said Monday.

The Wewelsfleth village with a population of 1,500 has been dubbed the “village of the damned”, said the Daily Mail.

Village mayor Ingo Karstens, who lost two wives to cancer, said: “It feels like a curse.”

Researchers from the University of Lubeck investigated the phenomenon and found cases of breast, lung, oesophageal, womb and stomach cancer.

They could, however, find no cause for the deadly disease.

Residents have blamed three nearby nuclear power plants and a shipyard where vessels were reportedly sprayed with toxic paint. Villagers say wind and rain blew in cancer-causing particles from those place into their homes.

Experts have probed the nuclear plants, the shipyard, asbestos sheeting used on roofs, electro-smog from power lines and the lifestyle of the cancer patients.