There will never be another Asghar Ali


 Jyoti Punwani
Mumbai Mirror | May 15, 2013, 12.00 AM IST
There will never be another Asghar Ali
Asghar Ali Engineer passed away on Tuesday. He was 74
By: Jyoti Punwani

Scholarly, courageous and secular, Asghar Ali Engineer spent his life combating regressive beliefs and practices while presenting a modern, humanistic interpretation of Islam

The passing away of Asghar Ali Engineer leaves everyone poorer. He wasn’t only the face of the Bohra reform movement – a movement for human rights supported by the tallest intellectuals of the country. He was a scholar of Islam, whose interpretation of it was progressive and humanistic, embracing the egalitarian ideals of Marxism and feminism. The world, including the bastion of conservative Islam, Saudi Arabia, invited Engineer to share his knowledge and liberal reading of his religion.

Engineer was a brave man. Assaulted six times, twice almost fatally, by orthodox Bohras, simply for fighting constitutionally against the absolute hold of the Syedna over the community, it would have been easy for him to give up a fight he began openly in 1973, with an article in The Times of India. The social boycott against him declared by the Bohra clergy cut him off for years from his family, including his mother, and in his words, “almost drove (me) mad”.

The political establishment, all the way up to Indira Gandhi and Vajpayee, stood solidly behind the Syedna. Yet, Engineer remained a Reformist throughout, and not just in his personal life. Under his guidance, the Reformists became a force to reckon with, with women at the forefront of the movement. He showed the same courage in openly organising support for the Shahbano judgment, when the Muslim establishment mounted acampaign against it.

For me, Asghar Ali Engineer was many things – a fount of knowledge and a guru, yet one so devoid of arrogance that I was able to, over the past 20 years, interact with him as a friend. I first met him as a member of the Committee for the Protection of Democratic Rights, of which he was both founder and vice-president. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, CPDR members used to demonstrate holding placards in a narrow lane across the road from Badri Mahal, Fort – that was as close to the Bohra headquarters as the police would allow us to get. Yet this insignificant bunch of youngsters, led by Engineer and a few other Reformists, would be considered enough of a threat to be stoned by orthodox Bohras. I used to be terrified, but not the much older Engineer.

As a novice in journalism, I turned to Engineer for everything concerning Muslims – be it history, the freedom movement, communal politics. Always ready to share his immense knowledge, he never grew impatient at my endless questions. I would interview others too, but no one had his rounded, secular, yet scholarly perspective.

In 1984, after seeing the partisan conduct of the police towards the Shiv Sena, during the riots that broke out in Bhiwandi, Thane and Mumbai, I told him I supported those young Muslims who felt revenge was the only solution. “No, never,” was his immediate response. “Revenge will only set off an endless cycle of violence, which will help no one, Muslims least of all.”

His way was to change minds. But that will take forever, I replied. Yet that’s what he never stopped trying to do through his writings and interactions with youngsters, policemen and IAS trainees. Every communal riot was investigated by him personally, or by his team, to trace the root causes, for as he said, religion was not the cause of conflict, its political use was.

Engineer won many awards, but the one that suited him best was the Right Livelihood Award or the Alternate Nobel, given to him in 2004 “for promoting religious and communal co-existence, tolerance and mutual understanding”.

With all his qualities, Engineer was essentially a simple man. I remember him walking outside his ramshackle building holding his little daughter Seema’s hand; remonstrating and embarrassed as his wife grumbled to me about being left behind for weeks as he travelled all over the world; chuckling at some wry comment on the irrelevance of pseudo-secularists.

Engineer had told his family he would like to be buried where his friends from the Progressive Writers Association, Kaifi Azmi, Jan Nisaar Akhthar and Ali Sardar Jafri, were. No doubt, he’ll be happy reciting Urdu poetry with them. But we, who still need him, will wonder where to find another like him.

WHEN ENGINEER BOWED BEFORE THE SYEDNA

The first and last time Engineer bowed in front of the Dawoodi Bohra high priest was when he was physically forced to by a marshal in the Syedna’s chamber. He had been taken there by his father, himself a priest, after his matriculation result was declared. Seeing others “fall on their knees and crawl with folded hands to the Syedna’s chamber, where he sat on a high chair like a king, (then) prostrate, lie with face down in submission before him,” Engineer refused, believing that sajda was to be performed only before Allah. Abusing him as ‘shaitaan’, a marshal caught his neck and forced it down. (From A Living Faith, Engineer’s autobiography)

 

Why is Mumbai abandoning its civic hospitals? #Healthcare


 

 - Rediff.com India News

By deserting public hospitals we are dismantling our public health-care system, says Dr Sanjay Nagral. | Why is Mumbai abandoning its civic hospitals?

Read entire article >

Why is Mumbai abandoning its civic hospitals?

May 09, 2013 10:56 IST

By deserting public hospitals we are dismantling our public health-care system, says Dr Sanjay Nagral.

The recent story of babies with heart defects dying in Mumbai’s [ Images ] civic hospitals while the procurement of a heart-lung machine was delayed is tragic and shocking.

The heart defects in these toddlers were eminently correctable by timely surgery, which not only would have saved lives but also lead to a normal quality of life.

Unlike bypass surgery, which may add a few years to life, surgery for repairing congenital heart defects can translate into a normal healthy life span. Many readers are likely to have dismissed it as yet another chapter in the now familiar media exposes on the crumbling systems in Mumbai’s public hospitals. And we will all soon if we already haven’t forgotten about these babies and their cruel fate.

Mumbai’s civic hospitals boast of some of the oldest and finest cardiac surgery departments in the country. A lot of the early pioneering works in cardiac surgery in India [ Images ] –including the earliest successful heart operations — were performed at KEM Hospital‘s cardiac surgery department. Many of us who have trained in KEM’s surgery department have been beneficiaries of this great legacy.

Even today Mumbai’s civic medical colleges and hospitals are considered amongst the best in the country, both for undergraduate and postgraduate studies. Mumbai’s civic budget for health is one of the highest in the country and the teaching hospitals get a lion’s share of this.

So why is it that the purchase of a lifesaving heart-lung machine gets delayed for so long and it takes a newspaper expose for the authorities to respond?

Is it all about bureaucracy, red tape and indifference of some officials?

It is indeed tempting to think so for this is an easy, simplistic explanation. We can then momentarily feel sad, perhaps a little outraged, rationalise it and go back to the comfort zones of our daily lives. But there is more to it.

And that bit is not about some inefficient civic official, it is about you and me.

Public hospitals in Mumbai were once the heart of health-care in the city. Except for the few super rich who would seek services in a fringe private sector a large majority of the population including the middle class were treated in these hospitals.

Check with your parents and grandparents, and they will tell you this. Over the years a burgeoning private sector started attracting larger and larger sections of the population.

Today most people including the poor seek health care in the private sector which is perceived as ‘efficient’ and of ‘better’ quality. The middle classes have largely abandoned these hospitals and even the poor seek their services only for major illnesses often after being bankrupted in the private sector. Thus, these hospitals have essentially moved out of the imagination of those who shape public opinion.

A majority of the doctors trained in these institutions seek careers abroad or in the private sector. They have largely become training grounds for nourishing the private health- care industry. And finally no bureaucrat or politician now seeks treatment in these institutions, preferring to get their treatment funded at private institutions.

At the Bhabha hospital in Bandra — one of the largest civic peripheral hospitals where I work part time as a surgeon — there is a predictable pattern to patients brought to our casualty with accidents. Those who are well to do will often be whisked away by their family and friends to nearby private hospitals, whereas the poor will continue to be treated with us.

Thus in the bomb blasts of 2006 most of the victims including those with serious injuries were transferred to private hospitals since they were from the first class compartment. In the previous year’s riots and floods we managed the victims.

Many years ago when I was at KEM I would treat a large number of friends and their family; people like you and me. Now I treat a large number of maids and drivers of friends at Bhabha, whilst I treat their employers in the private hospitals I work with.

A few years ago when a senior journalist friend chose to get himself operated at Bhabha a large number of common friends expressed surprise and even admiration for his act of ‘courage’.

In a subconscious collective act we have abandoned these institutions to those ‘others’ who inhabit a different space, who have no voice, clout or energy to fight the battle for decent health-care.

The parents of the kids fortunate to have their hearts fixed may thank the newspaper and the journalist who broke, and followed up the story. The act of getting a few private hospitals to do the pending cases is but only a temporary solution.

Even worse, it strengthens the belief that such care can only be provided in the private sector. Some of the private hospitals will seize the moment to actually market themselves.

The specific reason for the delay in sanctioning the heart-lung machines could have been a slowly moving file, an indifferent official or even a lack of follow-up from the departments concerned. But each time a life-saving ventilator doesn’t work, a CT scan is not available for a young man who has fallen off a train and a young pregnant woman dies, as she is transported from hospital to hospital in ramshackle ambulances, a media story cannot correct the problem.

Unless we realise that by abandoning these hospitals we are complicit in the process of dismantling our public health-care system. Whether we like it or not, at some stage in our lives we need the services of public hospitals; what if you are knocked down on the road and carried by passersby to the nearest public facility?

The heart-lung machines have probably been temporarily procured and unlike the unfortunate ones who died, some of the kids will now live to tell the tale of the holes in their hearts. Many years later when they grow up will there still be a long queue for poor kids born with heart defects?

Their fate is inextricably linked with the value we give to the development of an efficient public health system. And that in turn will be determined by whether we relate to our civic hospitals as our own and are outraged by its inadequacies and indifference.

The holes in the babies’s hearts is currently a gap in our collective minds.

Dr Sanjay Nagral is a consultant surgeon, department of surgical gastroenterology, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai. Photograph: Sahil Salvi

Dr Sanjay Nagral in Mumbai

 

Mumbai ​Soon, enroll for #aadhaar at six bus depots #UID


, TNN | Apr 25, 2013, 03.02 AM IST

MUMBAI: The government, after stopping Aadhaar registrations at housing societies and private-sector offices, will soon use BEST bus depots to double up as registration centres.

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has shortlisted six bus depots at Borivli, Bandra, Wadala, Anik, Mulund and Mumbai Central for the Aadhaar centres.

These depots will cater to the BEST employees working there and also people living in the vicinity.

“These bus depots have been shortlisted because they see a lot of commuters and also have many employees working there. We plan to have at least 5-7 machines at these centres so that the enrolment is fast and without any waiting time,” said a senior civic official.

Currently, the BMC has 145 centres and plans to add more than 300 centres soon.

So far, only 68% of people have been registered with the Unique Identification Authority of India. To increase the number of registrations, the BMC has decided to hunt for more government premises where the centres can be set up. This was necessitated after the state government issued a new circular barring UID centres on private premises.

The rule has been changed so that limited amount of resources can be used to first enrol the middle and lower middle class population as they are the beneficiaries of the various government schemes for which the UID will be required. Hence, these camps must be set up on government premises.

Several government schemes, such as cylinder subsidy, disbursement of provident fund for state employees and receiving free educational items for civic schoolchildren will require a UID card to be submitted and linked to bank accounts. However, for such schemes to kick into effect, about 80% of a district’s population needs to be registered for Aadhaar.

 

#Mumbai -Memorial meeting for Professor Lotika Sarkar (1927- 2013) @Mar 13


lot
                                                                                                 Dr. Mithu Alur, Founder Chairperson,

The Spastics Society of India

Invites you to a commemorative event

In fond memory of her Late Aunt

 

To celebrate her glorious life and to salute her efforts in making the country’s laws sensitive  and to uphold gender-justice, social justice and women’s rights

On Wednesday March 13, 2013 from  6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

  

 Professor Lotika Sarkar (1923- 2013)

 Eminent Scholar and Feminist

Renowned feminist scholars, activists of the women’s movement, legal luminaries, media personalities, and activists linked with NGOs and friends will express their tributes

 

At the Auditorium

National Resource Centre for Inclusion, ADAPT

K.C. Marg, Bandra Reclamation, Bandra (W),

Mumbai – 400050

 

The programme will be followed by Tea and snacks

R.S.V.P. Ms. Theresa D’Costa- 9820017792

 

#1billionrising Campaign in Mumbai #Vaw


TNN | Feb 16, 2013, 12.00 AM IST

One Billion Rising campaign in Mumbai
Watch Farhan Akhtar perform, using Alive
The global One Billion Rising campaign to stop violence against women found expression in Mumbai at the Bandra amphitheatre, where actors, artistes and activists together joined hands in an event organised by the NGO Akshara.Mita Vashisht recited some verses of Kashmiri poetry, while Rahul Bose recited a message written by Eve Ensler. Students from Sophia College and TISS also performed and showcased videos created for the occasion.

The issues of sex workers, the transgendered, the disabled, dalits, lesbians and minority communities were also addressed. The highlight of the evening was Farhan Akhtar, who recited a poem and then sang a song. He also performed an encore after the crowd urged him to sing another number.

Talking about the evening, he said, “It is wonderful to see so many people here in support of this cause. I am very happy that I am here and that I could be a part of this movement.”

 

Invitation- #Mumbai- Theatre of the oppressed- ‘ Tapori” @2Feb


TAPORI

Theatre-Art Performance Open for Rahiwasi Interaction

      • The Theatre of Oppressed

Zindabad!

Umang theater group and YUVA (Youth for Unity and Voluntary Action) are proud to present before you the first performance on stage of TAPORI which has been performing street theatre in various parts of the city.

TAPORI, an acronym for Theatre- Art Performance open for Rahiwasi (Residents) Interaction’ is a group of youth from Bandra who through theatre highlight the issues of their community and their daily struggles.

Munna Bhai Basti Chale’ is a satire on the lack of basic services such as water and sanitation in urban slums while ‘Kaam Karane ka Doosra Option’ is a humourous take on corruption.  Both these plays will be performed on the 2nd of February 2013 at 7:30pm.

 

Where: PL Deshpande Auditorium Maharashtra Kale

Academy, Near Siddhivinayak Temple, Sayani

Road, PrabhadeviMumbai – 400025

+(91)-(22)-24365990 | 24312956 | 24365997

Date: 02/02/2013 Time: 7:30 pm

We look forward to your presence at the performance.

In Solidarity

Contact : Aquila Khan 0929597546 Shabana Ansari 09594234789 Dinesh Mishra 09029956626

 

MC Manmeet lambasts YO YO Honey Singh and his #Rap #Vaw #1billionrising #protest #Foe


Manmeet Kaur the bubbly , lively ,  woman rapper , a  Japaite ,   set the stage on fire  at the program  ON 26TH jAN 2013, at Ambedkar bhavan  bhavan in Mumbai. The program on freedom of expression ‘ bOl ke lab azaad hain tere”.  T he program in support of freedom of speech and expression in Indian Constitution, A crusade for creativity – speak, your lips are free, had a plethora creative and artistic presentations in form of skits, songs, and dance .

No Indian can keep quiet, when the freedom of his country is for sale.

While the most lethal epidemic is spreading in the world, only a few humans stand resolute against the enemy of humanity and are determined to remain altruistic. At any given point of time, such people are only a small handful. Dictators consider them as a major threat, hence they first try to woo them to join the thieves’ guild and be one of them. If all fails, they are offered a high post in the governmental machinery, a position of power or even monetary funds, in order to silence their noble quest for ever. If these measures fail, they construct new prisons for these humane persons and try to crucify them.

What is going on today? There is a constitution in this country, albeit without a soul. All pillars of democracy are dilapidated. Only those who have financial capital, rule the media and can brag and pontificate on anything. The supporters of Brahmanism and under-belly of capitalism keep blabbering nonsense incessantly. Those who are misleading the society by screaming utter lies have been given freedom of expression; and those, who write and speak the truth are forcefully silenced either by means of the police power or by the side-kick fascist organisations. But these moves are no more a secret.

In video below Manmeet gives a very apt reply to Yo Yo Honey Singh and his rap music .

JOIN US FOR MUSICAL ACTIVISM HERE  JUSTICE AND PEACE FOR ALL

BLOCK FEB 14TH, FOR  ONE BILLION RISING MUMBAI, Manmeet and more  performnces hip hop, rap, belly dancing, flash dance

Here  is manmeeet singh, rapping on Yo Yo Honey Singh

 

#India- In Custody: Five Years in Jail and Innocent #sedition #dissent #Prison #Justice


  • January 15, 2013, 

    By Michael Edison Hayden, Wall street journal, India 

Roberto Schmidt/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images
A man peeked through an opening of a door to a prison ward at the Tihar jail, New Delhi, April 26, 2012.

This week, India Real Time presents an in-depth look at the country’s prison and custody system.

It is a system that still carries many attributes of its origins in British-run colonial India, and gives a high degree of discretion to how state governments apply the penal code — and who ends up behind bars, whether serving prison sentences, or in temporary army or police custody.

Experts note that the national government, over decades, hasn’t funded the expansion of the prison system to meet the increasing ranks of prisoners. In part, those ranks have increased because India’s court system is backlogged with 65% of India’s 240,000 people in jail yet to face a verdict in court, according to government data. They also point to allegations of abuse in army custody, which the army denies. 

In four chapters this week, India Real Time will examine different aspects of life under custody, as well as attempts to improve it. They include the experience of those facing trial as well as efforts being made to promote rehabilitation over punishment.

Arun Ferreira
Pictured, Arun Ferreira.

MUMBAI, India – When Arun Ferreira went to prison in 2007, his son was only two. Today, they are reunited, and a tide of private anguish has at last begun to roll back and wash away.

“My family didn’t tell him that I was in jail, they told him I was away on business for five years,” Mr. Ferreira says.

“Today, my son still doesn’t believe it. Recently, he saw a picture of Nelson Mandela somewhere. I explained who he was, and then I mentioned [what happened to me], and he thought I was fibbing.”

On an unusually sunny afternoon during monsoon season in the residential neighborhood of Bandra, Mr. Ferreira is gracious and funny as we sit in a local coffee shop to discuss his experience in jail. Mr. Ferreira was arrested under the auspices that he was a Maoist rebel, planning to blow up the Deekshabhoomi Complex, a monument in the town of Nagpur, where the Dalit icon Ambedkar is believed to have embraced Buddhism for the first time. Mr. Ferreira spent most of the following roughly four years and a half years in Nagpur’s Central Jail.

The Communist Party of India (Maoist), are also known as Naxalites, a reference to the West Bengal town of Naxalbari, where their movement began. Started as a left wing political group in the 1940s, in the 1960s they launched an armed struggle against the Indian government, which they have been violently opposing ever since.

Their largest support base comes from local tribes who seek to retain their land resisting industrial interests. In 2006, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh famously described Naxalism as “the single biggest internal security challenge ever faced by our country.” Members of the group could not be reached.

Mr. Ferreira was charged with attacking a police station, firing on police, and booked under the Unlawful Activities Act of 2004, a law created to bolster security against possible terrorist attacks.

Mr. Ferreira claims he was held for organizing slum-dwellers to unite in protest against the demolition of their homes. Such demolitions are a frequent source of strife here in Mumbai, often pitting poorer locals against police and property developers. Mr. Ferreira is currently out on bail and contesting two additional charges – allegations that he illicitly possessed arms and fired on police – that were leveled against him by plain-clothes officers during his time of awaiting trial in Nagpur. Mr. Ferreira denies any wrongdoing.

The Wall Street Journal
Source: National Crime Records Bureau

In Sept. 2011, a court ruled that Mr. Ferreira was innocent of all eight of the charges that were placed against him, over four years and eight months after his initial arrest.

Justice Hosbet Suresh, 83, is a former judge of the Mumbai High Court whose experience working inside the system has driven him, during his retirement years, to become an advocate for prisoners’ rights. He says that India’s slow trials are being made even slower by a lack of judicial manpower.

“There are simply not enough judges to handle all of the cases,” says Mr. Suresh. “We just have too few of them relative to the population here.”

According to the Indian Bar Association, as of 2010, there were over 30 million cases pending in courts across India due in large part to a ratio of 11 judges per million people. This leaves India with a persistent backlog of cases waiting to be heard.

As a result, “more than half of the prison population here is under trial,” Mr. Suresh estimates.

The Wall Street Journal
A graphic showing total inmates segregated by convicts, detainees and undertrial.

It’s a lot more than half: The most recent survey conducted by the National Crimes Record Bureau, a government agency, found that as many as 64.7% of Indian prisoners have not yet been convicted. And while prisoners who are ultimately convicted will see their time spent in jail while waiting for trial reduced from their sentence, such provisions provide very little consolation to the innocent, like Mr. Ferreira.

For some it’s even worse: According to the study, 1,486 under trial prisoners, or 0.6% % of the total, had been jailed for five years without having had a single day in court.

Another reason prisoners sometimes wait years for their trial is that, according to government data, the majority of those arrested are too poor to afford bail and legal counsel.

India lacks a federal department of prisons, like that of the United States. Instead, prisons are a responsibility of individual states, although the ministry of law lays out broad guidelines on how to administer them.

Mr. Ferreira believes his politics may have played a role in his prolonged detention. He says he was shuffled between several different facilities during his time at Nagpur Central. He spent his first year in the high security Anda barrack, and his final two years were spent in what’s known as the Gunah Khana, or punishment cells.

In between that time, Mr. Ferreira says he was placed with convicts in the Phasi yard. The Phasi yard is the gallows; it’s where death row inmates are kept. Mr. Ferreira says that guards told him that he was placed there for being a security threat.

When I reached out to Nagpur Central Jail, a senior official said the prison does not comment on the cases of specific inmates. The official added that it is the policy of the prison to keep convicts and prisoners who are under trials separated in adherence with the law. According to Mr. Ferreira’s account, he found himself rubbing shoulders with those convicted of the 1993 bomb blasts that rocked Mumbai, and with the perpetrators of the Kherlanji massacre of 2006, where Dalit men and women were slaughtered by upper caste Hindus.  He had little choice but to remain calm and do his best not to draw attention to himself for that entire year. A spokesman for Nagpur Central Jail declined to comment on Mr. Ferreira’s allegations.

 

– Vibhuti Agarwal contributed to this post.

Michael Edison Hayden is an American writer currently living in Mumbai. 

 

Republican Party of India, Amit Katarnayea, had filed a complaint against Trivedi #FOE #Sedition


 

Cartoonist Trivedi remanded to police custody

PTI

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Kanpur-based cartoonist Aseem Trivedi arrested on charges of posting seditious contents on his website being produced at court in Mumbai on Sunday.
PTIKanpur-based cartoonist Aseem Trivedi arrested on charges of posting seditious contents on his website being produced at court in Mumbai on Sunday.

Kanpur based cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, arrested for allegedly posting seditious content on his website, was today remanded to police custody till September 16 by a local court.

Trivedi, who was arrested on Saturday on the basis of a complaint filed in December, was produced before a court in Bandra which remanded him to police custody till September 16.

Police had sought his custody to question him on the contents on his website and other charges. The court had issued a non-bailable warrant against him last month.

A member of Republican Party of India, Amit Katarnayea, had filed a complaint against Trivedi that the latter had put up banners mocking the Indian constitution during the Anna Hazare rally held last year at the Bandra Kurla Complex. It was also alleged that he had put the obscene content on his website.

Outside the court, a defiant Trivedi said, “If telling the truth makes me traitor then I am one. Even Mahatma Gandi was called traitor and if I am booked under sedition for doing service to the nation then I will continue to do so.”

While police officers said that he had shown disrespect to the National flag and he was arrested under 124A of the Indian Penal Code for sedition besides various sections of the Information Technology Act.

Trivedi was due to fly to Syria on Wednesday to receive a cartooning award.

“If anyone is talking against corruption, proclaiming it as anti-national and slamming charges of sedition, one needs to understand that this is against the government and not against the country,” said Mayank Gandhi, a member of IAC.

He said further said that Trivedi was not a member of the IAC “but is fighting corruption and we are here to give him moral support”.

 

Award Winning cartoonist Aseem Trivedi keeps his promise, held


 

Express news service : Mumbai, Sun Sep 09 2012,

Aseem Trivedi is facing sedition charges in a Beed court, to be produced in a Bandra court today.

Political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi on Saturday surrendered to police at the Bandra-Kurla Complex (BKC) police station, where complaints had been filed against him for insulting the national emblem and other national symbols in his anti-corruption cartoons. The Kanpur-based cartoonist was arrested and will be produced in a Bandra Holiday court on Sunday 10am. The cartoonist, against whom several cases have been filed in the state and who is facing sedition charges, had on Thursday said he would surrender.

Caricatures made by Trivedi had been displayed during the anti-corruption protests led by Anna Hazare at the MMRDA grounds in BKC last December. Private complaints had been filed at the police station against Trivedi, 25, a freelance cartoonist and this year’s recipient of ‘Courage in Editorial Cartooning Award’ of Cartoonists Rights Network International, based in Virginia.

Trivedi had shared the award with Syrian cartoonist Ali Ferzat who is on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people.

Among the controversial cartoons for which complaints were filed against him are one of the national emblem in which the four lions are shown as wolves, blood oozing from their mouth and the word ‘Satyameva’ replaced with ‘Bhrashtameva’ in the inscription ‘Satyameva Jayate’ below the emblem. In another depiction he has depicted the Parliament House as a toilet. In yet another cartoon, ‘Mother India’ is depicted as a woman who is about to be raped.

A case has also been filed in the Bombay High Court against him under the State Emblem of India (Prohibition of Improper Use) Act 2005, which may attract a two-year prison term and a fine up to Rs 5,000.

Mumbai Police’s cyber wing that had blocked Trivedi’s website, http://www.cartoonsagainstcorruption.com last December, sparking a row on freedom of expression, had on Thursday said they did not recall the specific case, as they routinely block objectionable sites.

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